Music BMus(Hons) 2017-18

This course also available for 2016-17 entry

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About the course

You're looking for a practically and creatively driven Music course, with a dynamic staff including professional musicians. Our outstanding facilities and considerable size enable you to experience music-making of many styles. You'll have the opportunity to develop transferable skills from participating in orchestras, choirs, bands, through creative work and your own research. The optional placement year could give you the edge in your chosen career in music.

•  You'll be based in the Creative Arts Building, with its purpose-built facilities of practice rooms, rehearsals and recording studio and the Phipps Concert Hall, complete with replica Baroque organ.

•  You'll be taught by enthusiastic staff – many of whom are recognised nationally and internationally in their chosen specialisms - and by a team of part-time instrumental and vocal teachers from regional and national orchestras, many of whom are distinguished solo performers.

•  Our courses are practically and creatively driven, giving you the opportunity to specialise in either composition, performance or musicology, or to follow a broad-based path of study combining any of these.

•  You'll have plenty of opportunity to perform – in recitals, concerts, masterclasses or workshops. Recent masterclass guests include Emma Kirkby (voice), Rod Franks (trumpet), Martin Roscoe (piano) and Wissam Boustany (flute).

•  As a composer you'll have opportunities throughout your course to hear your work performed by professionals – recent workshop participants include vocal ensemble EXAUDI, Neil Heyde (cello), Richard Haynes (clarinet), Mark Knoop (piano) and the instrumental group ELISION.

•  If you're a musicologist, you'll be able to study the development of music across history, choosing from specialisms such as baroque music, experimental music or film music, studying the subject within its historical and cultural contexts.

•  Our optional placement year taken in Year 3 can add to your portfolio, which could give you the edge in your chosen career. You do not have to decide whether you wish to undertake a placement until your second year.

•  Music scored 93% for overall satisfaction in the 2016 National Student Satisfaction Survey, ranking it the best in Yorkshire.

"If you want a course that shapes you as an individual, led by a friendly and dynamic team of inspirational people who are not just lecturers but active, leading practitioners in their fields, then Huddersfield is the uni for you. And with the world's leading contemporary music festival on your doorstep, what more could you ask for!"
Tracy Bryant, Music in the Round, Winner of the RPS Award for Chamber Music and Song, and the David Bedford Award for Music Education "Huddersfield's suite of BMus programmes provides a very rich set of opportunities for musicians wishing to study at degree level. Its BMus is orientated towards the education of the complete musician and provides an ideal balance of practical, professional and research-led approaches to musical study."
Professor Celia Duffy, Royal Conservatoire of Scotland

What our external examiners say: "The curriculum … is at the forefront of current trends."
Dr Christopher Dingle "Huddersfield continues to be one of the leading music departments of choice for those wishing to study … contemporary composition. The spirit of experimentation and emphasis on technique [is clearly evident]. The course also provides solid support for students who wish to explore orchestration/arrangement and to work with particular ensemble line-ups, such as wind band."
Dr John Habron

Here's what current Music student Chloe has to say about her course.

Course scholarships available – up to £3000. More details.


UCAS code:
W300

Start date:
18 / 09 / 2017

Duration:

3 years full-time
4 years inc. placement year

Entry requirements

Entry requirements for this course are normally one of the following:

•  BBB at A Level including a minimum grade B in Music or Music Technology

•  DDM in BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma

•  120 UCAS tariff points from a combination of Level 3 qualifications including a minimum grade B at A Level in Music or Music Technology

•  Practical and theory music grades are accepted in the total points (see UCAS tariff).

•  Applicants intending to study instrumental or vocal performance must have reached at least Grade 8 standard of the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music (ABRSM) or equivalent at entry and attend an audition.

•  Pass Access to Higher Education Diploma with 45 Level 3 credits at Merit or above to include modules in Music or Music Technology

•  International Baccalaureate with an overall score of 31 points to include modules in Music or Music Technology.

Other suitable experience or qualifications will be considered. For further information please see the University's minimum entry requirements at http://www.hud.ac.uk/undergraduate/howtoapply/entryrequirements/ For international students:

•  You should demonstrate your ability to play to approximately Grade 8 ABRSM standard and provide proof via a DVD, or a link to a url movie, or the actual exam. You'll also be required to demonstrate your music theory ability, ideally to Grade 8 ABRSM (again this could come from the exam or from any piece of notation - for example, harmony exercises or compositions).

Please note: UCAS points are based on the new UCAS tariff, introduced for courses starting in 2017/18.

Contact:

Admissions Tutor

Tel: +44 (0)1484 472003

Email: musicadmissions@hud.ac.uk

Follow us on Twitter @huddsunimusic
Visit our Facebook page

Places available:
70 (this number may be subject to change)

Location:
Huddersfield, HD1 3DH

Find out how to apply Book on an Open Day Order a prospectus Ask a question

Course content

In Year 1 you'll study a number of core subjects designed to give you a solid foundation for later years of your course. In Years 2 and 3 (or 4 if you choose to take the optional placement year) you will have the opportunity to develop skills as a composer, performer or musicologist, or you can maintain a broad range of subjects. Year 3 options include understanding music's role in the professional marketplace. You can also choose to spend Year 3 on placement, with the opportunity to enhance your career potential.

You will have the opportunity to take part in a number of directed ensembles which may include symphony orchestra, brass band, chamber choir, big band, symphonic wind orchestra, opera group and new music ensemble, to name but a few. You'll enjoy recitals, workshops and concerts by visiting artists, as well as experiencing the world-famous Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival, hosted by the University.

Year 1


 Core modules:

Introduction to Music Research

The module will introduce you to a wide range of music, from medieval and renaissance song to contemporary film scores, and from romantic symphonies to popular song traditions. Key issues, themes and controversies in musicology will be considered.


Introduction to Analysis

The module will provide you with a grounding in the basic skills of musical analysis through the study of classical and popular music. Both printed scores and recordings will be studied to give you the opportunity to develop the complementary skills of score-based analysis and/or aural analysis and critical listening.


Composition 1

This module offers an essential introduction to the fundamentals of composition by exploring the various musical parameters of melody, harmony, rhythm, timbre and texture through a series of preliminary exercises given in seminars and group tutorials. In term two you will be able to build on this knowledge through the creation of a portfolio of short pieces for keyboard, voice and strings. The second term also includes demonstrations and performances from visiting professional artists. Assessment is though portfolio of coursework.


Performance Skills 1

This module is designed to help you to gain key skills in general musicianship. You will learn about and practice skills in improvisation and aural awareness, as well as gain experience in critical evaluation of concerts and your own development as a musician. You will have the opportunity to develop skills and experience in ensemble performance and participation. Assessment consists of practical tests and coursework assignments in which you will demonstrate your knowledge, understanding and skills through written assignments, music performance, and practical tests of your musicianship.

Option modules:

Choose one from a list which may include-

Technology for Music

This module introduces key practical concepts of technology used within music and is designed specifically for students on our BMus course. You will have the chance to learn how to use music notation and DAW applications alongside recording techniques focused on 'classical' concert hall work and location based recording. The module is assessed via a recording test and culminates with a composition project using the Logic Pro.


Computer Composition 1

In this foundation module you will study composition and technical processes for writing in a range of possible genres, and will have the opportunity to develop a broad understanding of sound synthesis, audio manipulation and music production skills. The module includes tuition on technical fundamentals while introducing composers and genres that constitute the breadth of sound computer-based composition offers. Topics include theory and practice in sound synthesis and sampling, and genres include Musique Concrète, Elektronische Musick, ambient music, and contemporary electronic music artists and styles. Assessment is through coursework: creative exercises, free composition and accompanying written documents.

Plus one from a list which may include-

Stylistic Composition

You will attend weekly lectures and seminars that explore a variety of stylistic compositional approaches from Baroque to 20th Century. The emphasis will not be on originality but on developing a heightened sense of stylistic awareness through the close examination of a work’s instrumentation and compositional materials as well as its form and structure. In addition to utilising works within their original context, the module will use examples that demonstrate ways in which these stylistic idioms have been drawn upon and adapted by the modern film composer. You will produce a short folio of compositions in term one and an extended composition with commentary in term two.


Solo Performance 1

You will work closely with an individual instrumental/vocal tutor throughout the year to develop your technical skills and musical insight to prepare you for solo and ensemble performance at intermediate and Honours level.


Songwriting 1

This module provides an introduction to songwriting and raises the question of what songwriting is, or might be, in the twenty first century. Through the exploration of a range of compositional and vocal techniques, you will aim to acquire a knowledge and understanding of an array of songwriting styles both historical and contemporary with the view of developing an individual creative voice. You will have the opportunity to explore approaches to lyric writing, chord progressions and song structure, utilising different accompaniments.


Grooves, Glitches and Crackles (Foundation Studies in Popular Music and Electronica)

This module traces both the developments and practical applications of technology in compositional practice as well as aesthetic issues in sound technology and practice. It will help you embrace theoretical writings concerning the proliferation of popular genres in contemporary culture as well as ways in which the computer and other technologies have challenged the definitions of sound and music. Key topics include: the history of early recording and electronic instruments, music and ethnicity, mixers, DJs and turntablism, club culture, electronica and sampling practice. The module is assessed through coursework, including two essays and an album review.

Year 2


 Option modules:

Choose at least two from a list which may include-

Music On Stage: Opera and Musica Theatre from Orfeo to Matilda 1

Music on Stage explores the changing relationship between music and drama in opera and musical theatre from the early 1600s to the present day. The creation of a musical stage work requires composers and librettists to work together. This module encourages you to critically explore the issues surrounding this whilst exploring a series of illustrative works from performance, compositional and cultural-historical perspectives.


Singers and their Songs: Music, text and Performance Before 1600 1

This module will explore the rich heritage of song before 1600, from the courtly love lyrics of the troubadours to the development of polyphonic vocal polyphony that typified the early modern period. The history of song relates directly to performance, composition and theory, as well as to the history of literature, religion, and the art history. You will have the opportunity to lean early notation and prepare your own editions. You may wish to support your work through participation in the Early Music Ensemble.


Scoring the Silver Screen: the Musicology of Film and Television

Scoring the Silver Screen introduces you to a range of analytical, critical, and theoretical approaches to music and sound in film and television. You will explore the evolving relationships between technology, economics, and aesthetics in the history of moving images media, with case studies ranging from 'silent' films and classic Hollywood musicals to art-house cinema, contemporary blockbusters, and television serials.


Popular Music Studies

This module will help you to develop an understanding of popular music within specific cultural and musical contexts. It will consider a range of popular music genres from reggae to heavy metal to synth pop and beyond. These will be used to explore the interface between popular music and several disciplines within musicology, such as music technology, philosophy, sociology, critical musicology and gender studies. You will be assessed on a set essay, a presentation proposal and a presentation of a case study of your own choice. You will have the opportunity to collaborate with a partner in producing the proposal and doing the presentation


Historical Performance

This module investigates how we can use and critically evaluate a range of sources of information to inform ourselves about how music might have sounded in the past (both recent and distant), and how we can apply this ‘historical awareness’ to the performance of a variety of musical repertories. These sources include musical scores, literary descriptions of music-making, pictures and other visual arts, historical sound recordings and musical instruments themselves. Teaching will include tutor-led lectures and student-led seminars; assessment is through course work, including peer-assessed group presentation, essays, seminar presentations or researched performances.


Experimental Music 1

In this module you will explore and gain understanding of the defining elements of experimental music. Weekly lectures will introduce new ideas, composers and musical works, which will be explored through performances, group activities, discussions and presentations. No performing experience is required – just an open mind and willingness to experiment! Assessment will be a combination of practical and coursework, including the choice of a performance of an experimental work, a composition, or a seminar presentation.


Music In Vienna 1770-1830

This module examines the music and musicians of Vienna during the period 1770-1830 and the social, cultural, aesthetic, technical, political, philosophical, economic and religious life of that centre, putting into context how music functions in the complex environment of a major population centre.

Plus choose up to four from a list which may include-

Techniques of Music Analysis 1

You will explore a number of approaches to the analysis of tonal and non-tonal music, including Schenkerian analysis and pitch-class set theory. Classes involve the exploration of the theory behind these approaches and its practical application to examples. The module is assessed through coursework, which consists of analyses of two pieces of piano or chamber music.


Intermediate Composition

This module offers an individualised plan of learning leading towards the production of a unique portfolio of compositions. Tuition is provided through weekly individual 30-minute composition tutorials as well as third weekly masterclasses. Composers have the opportunity to write for at least one visiting artist or ensemble of international importance or explore various in-house opportunities. A variety of workshops are offered throughout the year to support your study. Assessment is through coursework.


Composition 2: Composition Techniques and Analysis

This module builds on Composition 1 with units in Instrumentation and Analysis. You look in detail at the physical and idiomatic possibilities of instruments, how they work, and how this can be developed to explore new sounds. The analysis component examines the techniques of other composers to see how they create form and structure. You will gain understanding of how to take the material explored in Composition 1 and develop this alongside instrument knowledge and compositional technique. The module is a mix of lectures, performer workshops, and clinics with invited guest composers. Assessment is by portfolio of compositions and two analyses.


Computer Composition 2

Building on the skills and knowledge acquired in Computer Composition 1 or Technology for Music, this module provides further study of the techniques of computer music including synthesis, sequencing, sampling, editing, processing and mixing, and an exploration of the creative potential of these techniques. The module is based around the subversive use of software, focusing on helping you to become a critical and creative user of the technology, in order to go far beyond the user manual. Assessment is mostly practical, based around two compositions created throughout the year with the support of the tutors, and a reflective commentary on the process.


Solo Performance 2 (Minor)

You will have the opportunity to work closely with an individual instrumental/vocal tutor to develop your technical skills and musical insight to help prepare you for a solo recital and advanced solo performance at honours level.


Performance Skills 2 (Major)

In this module you will be able to select two areas of study from a list of performance areas, such as chamber music, directed ensembles or conducting. You will be assessed by practical examinations and coursework assignments. The module provides ample opportunities for you to develop your knowledge, understanding and skills in a wide range of performance areas, guided and coached by our team of expert full and part-time performance and instrumental staff.


Performance Skills 2 (Minor)

In this module you will be able to select one area of study from a list of performance areas, such as chamber music, directed ensembles or conducting. You will be assessed by practical examinations and coursework assignments. The module provides opportunities for you to develop your knowledge, understanding and skills in a wide range of performance areas, guided and coached by our team of expert full and part-time performance and instrumental staff.


Popular Music Directed Ensembles 1

In this module you are coached as a fully formed band in more advanced groups. The ensembles you could be in are: Folk, Blues, Funk, Reggae/ska, Prog Rock, Jazz, Laptop Ensemble, Frank Zappa Band, Guitar Orchestra, Guitar Improvisation, A Capella Choir, Samba Band plus the opportunity to create original bands. Assessment comes in the form of two practical gigs through the year and a reflective report tracking your experience in the module.


Scoring and Arranging for Brass Band and Symphonic Wind Orchestra

Following a week-by-week introduction to the instrumentation of the brass band and symphonic wind orchestra, techniques of writing idiomatically and resourcefully for these instruments will be investigated by means of the study and analysis of various hymn tune, piano and orchestral works. Practical workshops and class discussions will encourage professional skills in working in collaborative situations, utilising scoring techniques and critical reflection. You will have the opportunity to develop these skills through the study and analysis of key works composed or arranged for brass band or symphonic wind orchestra. Assessment is by one portfolio of two arrangements and a final portfolio of a transcription, arrangement or composition.


Orchestration 1

This module examines a range of approaches to orchestration from the Baroque to the present day, focusing on the characteristics of individual instruments, their ranges and tone colours, as well as strategies for the
combinations of instruments, including issues of balance, voicing, doubling, and effective control of orchestral textures. Assessment is through coursework.


Explorations in World Musics 1

This module will introduce you to styles of music popular around the world in the past and in the present, such as Vietnamese Pop, Baltic folk music and Aboriginal country music. It will also have a local focus, and one piece of assessment will ask you to work with musical group in the Huddersfield area, whether through musical collaboration, ethnographic research, or recording them. This course will also introduce analytical tools that will help you conceptualise these styles of music and place them within their cultural and political contexts.  It will draw on a wide range of disciplines, including ethno-musicology, musicology, anthropology, popular music studies, post-colonial studies and history.


Empirical Musicologies 1: Data-Driven Approaches to Musical Study

You'll be introduced to a range of approaches in empirical musicology – a branch of musicology concerned more with objective knowledge and evidence than with subjective judgement. The module will help you to develop understanding and skills in handling empirical data systematically – in such fields as music analysis, music psychology, musical creativity research and music data encoding/storage/retrieval, among others – in order to address music-related questions. It will also help you to understand the nature and range of music-related research-problems which can be addressed by empirical approaches


Music in Educational Contexts

This module explores the role of the musician in a range of informal and formal music education contexts. You will have the chance to develop the knowledge and skills to plan and evaluate music education activities, and enhance your understanding by undertaking a work shadowing placement.

Year 3 - optional placement year

The placement year is designed to help you to enhance your professional skills by giving you the opportunity to do a significant period of work in a graduate-level work environment, or by spending a year studying abroad. The placement would normally be with one institution or organisation, usually for 40 weeks, working approximately 30 hours per week, but exceptionally you could opt to undertake two placements of approximately equal length (20 weeks per placement). Previous students have undertaken placements at peripatetic music service, schools, a community arts project, a festival, recording studios and a concert venue. You would identify a suitable placement for yourself, but will be assisted by the Module Tutor. If you wish to take your placement abroad you will be assisted by the Modern Languages/ERASMUS co-ordinator. The module is assessed through regular progress reports, submitted via an online blog, in addition to a report from the employer. The module is ungraded (pass/fail).

Final year

Core modules:

Research for Music

In this module, you will explore a range of reading materials relating to musicology and its sub-disciplines. Guided reading leads to an open exam paper, which is undertaken in your own time over a two-week period. The final part of the year is spend researching and writing an extended essay on a musical topic of your own devising, with supervision from your tutor. Research and writing skills training are also given as part of the teaching for this module. The assessment is therefore coursework-based, and closely matched to your own interests and specialism.


Work and Professional Practice in Music

In this option, you will have the opportunity to develop skills relevant to the world of work by studying aspects of professional practice in a number of music-related professions (for example, teaching, performing, composing, journalism, studio management, editing, recording company), followed by a suitable work placement. Teaching is in the form of guest lectures from professionals. Assessment is through coursework relating to your career research and placement.

Option modules:

Choose up to four from a list which may include-

Individual Project

This module gives you the opportunity to develop an extended creative project or written dissertation. It gives you the chance to focus on one of the key areas of your degree course. The module is assessed through coursework, including a written report and extended project. Project topics include work on composition, musicology, computer programming, mixed-media work or performance. Classes involve weekly one-to-one tutorials with your academic supervisor.


Music On Stage: Opera and Musical Theatre from Orfeo to Matilda 2

Music on Stage explores the changing relationship between music and drama in opera and musical theatre of the principal Western traditions from the early 1600s to the present day. The creation of a musical stage work requires composers and librettists to work together. This module invites a critical exploration of issues surrounding this whilst exploring a series of illustrative works from performance, compositional and cultural-historical perspectives.


Singers and their Songs: Music, text and Performance Before 1600 2

You will explore the rich heritage of song from before 1600, from the courtly love lyrics of the troubadours to the development of polyphonic vocal polyphony that typified the early modern period. The history of song relates directly to performance, composition and theory, as well as to the history of literature, religion, and the art history. You will have the opportunity to learn early notation and prepare your own editions. You may wish to support your work through participation in the Early Music Ensemble.


Advanced Composition

This module offers an individualised plan of learning leading towards the production of a unique portfolio of compositions. Tuition is provided through weekly individual 30-minute composition tutorials as well as third weekly masterclasses. You will have the opportunity to write for at least one visiting artist or ensemble of international importance or explore various in-house opportunities. A variety of workshops are offered throughout the year to support your study. Assessment is through the submission of a portfolio of original compositions and an accompanying commentary.


Composing Music for Film B

This practical composition module takes you through the craft of composing original scores for film. Following on from AIM2505 Music and the Moving Image, it provides tuition in the technical practices of soundtrack composition: spotting cues, creating live soundtracks for film, arranging and orchestrating cues provided, and working with technology to create realistic soundtracks. This gives you the opportunity to develop the skills to undertake a practical analysis of music for various media: film, television and computer games.


Music in the 21st Century

This module explores the major issues and materials of current musical thought and practice. We will draw on a wide range of styles and genres to examine the diversity of music in the early 21st Century, and will focus in particular on some of the aesthetic challenges and debates raised by this diversity. Assessment is through coursework, including a final project that provides opportunities for you to develop your own creative ways of demonstrating the findings from your independent research, including performance, composition, installations, multimedia presentations, blogs, websites and podcasts.


Computer Composition 3

Building on the experience you have gained in Computer Composition 1 and 2, you will produce a composition using multi-channel sound, with or without video, or interactive sound design (ISD1 and 2 prerequisite for the latter option). You will be introduced to new techniques including the use of spatialisation, video, interactive or mixed media work. You will be supported through the creative process through weekly tutorials over one term only, where you will be helped to develop your ability to work with such techniques creatively, and you will have extensive access to the studios. The assessment is mostly practical, based on a work submitted with an accompanying reflective commentary.


Popular Music Directed Ensembles 2

In this module you are coached as a fully formed band in more advanced groups with the expectation that you will take a leading role in the group. The ensembles you could be in are: Folk, Blues, Funk, Reggae/ska, Prog Rock, Jazz, Laptop Ensemble, Frank Zappa Band, Guitar Orchestra, Guitar Improvisation, A Capella Choir, Samba Band plus the opportunity to create original bands. Assessment comes in the form of two practical gigs through the year and an audio report tracking your experience in the module.


Music, Gender and Identity

This module explores the relationship between music and identity. It encourages you to question the relationship between creativity and gender in diverse areas of musical activity, from composition and scholarship to performance itself. The module is assessed through coursework, including written and spoken assignments. Sample topics include work on masculinity in rock, film music, women composers, music and disability, and the presentation of gendered roles on the operatic stage; classes provide opportunity to debate your ideas with others.


Experimental Music 2

In this module you will explore and gain understanding of the defining elements of experimental music. Weekly lectures will introduce new ideas, composers and musical works, which will be explored through performances, group activities, discussions and presentations. No performing experience is required – just an open mind and willingness to experiment! Assessment will be a combination of practical and coursework, including the choice of a performance of an experimental work, a composition, or a seminar presentation.


Techniques of Music Analysis 2

You will explore a number of approaches to the analysis of tonal and non-tonal music, these including Schenkerian analysis and pitch-class set theory. Classes involve the exploration of the theory behind these approaches and its practical application to examples. The module is assessed through coursework, which consists of analyses of two pieces of piano or chamber music.


Explorations in World Musics 2

This module will introduce you to styles of music popular around the world in the past and in the present, such as Vietnamese Pop, Baltic folk music and Aboriginal country music. It will also have a local focus, and one piece of assessment will ask you to work with musical group in the Huddersfield area, whether through musical collaboration, ethnographic research, or recording them. This course will also introduce analytical tools that will help you conceptualise these styles of music and place them within their cultural and political contexts.  It will draw on a wide range of disciplines, including ethno-musicology, musicology, anthropology, popular music studies, post-colonial studies and history.


Empirical Musicologies 2: Data-Driven Approaches to Musical Study

You'll be introduced to a range of approaches in empirical musicology – a branch of musicology concerned more with objective knowledge and evidence than with subjective judgement. The module will help you to develop understanding and skills in handling empirical data systematically – in such fields as music analysis, music psychology, musical creativity research and music data encoding/storage/retrieval, among others – in order to address music-related questions. It will also help you to understand the nature and range of music-related research-problems which can be addressed by empirical approaches.


Solo Performance 3 (Minor)

This module allows you to pursue solo performance and is available to all students who have received a sufficiently high mark in their solo recital in the second year. You will work closely with an individual instrumental/vocal tutor, receiving 11 hours of individual tuition, to develop your technical skills and musical insight. Assessment is entirely practical and tuition is tailored to prepare you for two solo recitals. You will also attend a supporting programme of master classes and workshops which will develop your understanding of a range of issues relating to musical performance.


Studies in Performance

This module is designed to support your solo performance work if you are enrolled on one of the two solo performance modules in the third year. You will be introduced to a variety of issues confronting performers, such as authenticity, analysis, notation and editions, and you will consider ways in which these topics may be applied to your own practice as a performer. You will also be encouraged to make constructive criticism of your own and of others’ performances through regular performance classes. Assessment is through coursework designed to develop your understanding of essential performance practice issues.


Performance Skills 3 (Major)

In this module, which is the Honours Level equivalent to Performance Skills 2, you will be able to select two areas of study from a list of performance areas, such as chamber music, directed ensembles or conducting. You will be assessed by practical examinations and coursework assignments. The course provides opportunities for you to develop your knowledge, understanding and skills in a wide range of performance areas, guided and coached by our team of expert full and part-time performance and instrumental staff.


Performance Skills 3 (Minor)

In this module, which is the Honours Level equivalent to Performance Skills 2, you will be able to select one area of study from a list of performance areas, such as chamber music, directed ensembles or conducting. You will be assessed by practical examinations and coursework assignments. The module provides opportunities for you to develop your knowledge, understanding and skills in a wide range of performance areas, guided and coached by our team of expert full and part-time performance and instrumental staff.


Orchestration 2

This module examines a range of approaches to orchestration from the Baroque to the present day, focusing on the characteristics of individual instruments, their ranges and tone colours, as well as strategies for the combinations of instruments, including issues of balance, voicing, doubling, and effective control of orchestral textures. Assessment is through coursework.

In any year of study, one module outside the named degree programme, but offered within the School of Music, Humanities and Media, may be taken as an alternative to any of the option modules listed above where feasible and subject to timetabling restrictions and the approval of your Course Leader.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below.

We review all optional modules each year and change them to reflect the expertise of our staff, current trends in research and as a result of student feedback. We will always ensure that you have a range of options to choose from and we will let students know in good time the options available for them to choose for the following year.

We will only change core modules for a course if it is necessary for us to do so, for example to maintain course accreditation. We will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible, usually before you begin the relevant academic year.

Sometimes we have to make changes to other aspects of a course or how it is delivered. We only make these changes if they are for reasons outside of our control, or where they are for our students’ benefit. Again, we will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible, usually before the relevant academic year. Our regulations set out our procedure which we will follow when we need to make any such changes.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Higher Education Funding Council for England is the principal regulator for the University.

Placements

In addition to the compulsory short term (8 week) work placement in the final year via the Work and Professional Practice module, this course offers you the opportunity to take an optional one-year (40 week) work placement after your second year, in the UK or abroad. Previous placement providers have included Kirklees Music School, West Yorkshire Playhouse, Phoenix Radio, Stagecoach Theatre Arts, Buxton Opera House and Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival.

Disability should not prevent you from securing a placement and we encourage all students with a disability to aim to do a placement. We can offer support and advice on overcoming any perceived challenges.

Career opportunities

95% of graduates from this course go on to work and/or further study within six months of graduating. Graduates have gone on to work in performance, teaching, composition, arranging, arts administration, community music, music therapy, brass bands and church music. A selection of companies that have employed Huddersfield graduates in recent years include Royal Northern College of Music, Chethams School of Music, Opera North, Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment and Calderdale Music Services*. *Source: Linked In.

Teaching and assessment

25.7% of the study time on this course is spent in lectures, seminars, workshops etc.

You'll learn in a range of teaching and learning formats, including lectures, seminars, individual tutorials, practical workshops, composition clinics, masterclasses and rehearsals, and opportunities for individually devised projects that may involve off-campus placements. Students are encouraged to take a full part in extra-curricular activities, including participation in Directed Ensembles, chamber music and concert attendance both on and off campus.

Assessment of this course takes various forms including written and oral examinations, dissertations, essays, seminar papers, analyses, practical projects, composition folios, performance recitals, learning journals and peer assessment.

Your module specification/course handbook will provide full details of the assessment criteria applying to your course.

Feedback (either written and/or verbal) is normally provided on all coursework submissions within three term time weeks – unless the submission was made towards the end of the session in which case feedback would be available on request after the formal publication of results.Feedback on final coursework is available on request after the publication of results.

Huddersfield is the only University where 100% of the teaching staff are Fellows of the Higher Education Academy.*

*permanent staff, after probation: some recently appointed colleagues will only obtain recognition in the months after their arrival in Huddersfield, once they have started teaching.

Facilities

You'll have access to a great range of equipment and facilities including 26 practice rooms, two large piano practice rooms, an early music studio and a dedicated performance venue. You'll also find four pop performance rooms and two concert venues - St Paul's Hall and the Phipps Concert Hall. The Phipps Hall in the Creative Arts Building seats 120 and is linked to the main Pro-Tools recording studio as well as three 5.1 composition studios with two live rooms with the capability to record from the concert hall.

Creative Arts Building (CAB)

The centrepiece of Music and Music Technology is the Creative Arts Building, a £15m, purpose-built, state-of-the-art facility which opened in July 2008. The building has a spacious, glass-enclosed, four-storey atrium which is used for informal concerts, displays of student work, installations, and as a meeting place for students from various disciplines. The music teaching facilities in the CAB include: •  The Phipps Concert Hall - performance and rehearsal space with two grand pianos (including Steinway D) and professional-quality recording studio attached. It also houses a 26 stop, two manual tracker action organ
 •  four 'smart classrooms' fitted with cutting-edge audio/video hardware and software
 •  one 25-seat PC lab and two 24-seat Mac labs
 •  26 practice rooms
 •  one large ensemble and four chamber/pop ensemble rehearsal rooms
 •  two large piano practice rooms
 •  two percussion practice rooms
 •  organ practice room
 •  extensive instrument collection
 •  early music studio
 •  a range of Music Technology studios and workstations.

The Phipps Concert Hall


Housed within the Creative Arts Building, the Phipps Concert Hall is a flexible, multi-purpose space used for concerts, teaching, and rehearsals. It seats 120, contains two grand pianos (including a new Steinway D) and is attached to a professional-quality recording studio. With adjustable acoustic curtains, the Hall is particularly well suited for multi-channel electroacoustic music.

The Phipps Hall also contains a 26-stop, two-manual tracker action organ built by the firm of JW Walker. A very generous gift of Mr Michael Phipps, the organ was designed as an historic copy of a late 17th Century North German instrument, taking as its inspiration the famous Arp Schnitger organ at Steinkirchen. The organ is tuned to unequal temperament (Valotti).

St Paul's Hall

St Paul's Hall is a beautifully converted Georgian church built in 1829 that now provides a venue for a range of concerts by student soloists, ensembles and guest artists in the Music Department's annual Concerts Series. In November each year the Hall also hosts many of the Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival events – the Festival's home is at the University of Huddersfield. The church, which was renovated into a concert hall in 1980, seats 400 and houses a 3-manual 41-stop tracker-action recital organ (1977), two concert grand pianos, and a recording studio, together with outstanding lighting and sound-projection systems.

Music Library


The music library, renovated in September 2008, houses a wide range of scores, recordings and videos, including extensive performing materials for solo, chamber, and ensemble music. It maintains print and digital subscriptions to all major music periodicals. The library includes listening stations, PCs, and four group listening rooms. It is particularly notable for its extensive collection of scores and recordings of 20th and 21st Century music and is constantly being expanded in response to requests by staff and students. The library also houses the immense resources of the British Music Collection which will be further expanded by a £1.4m Heritage Lottery Fund grant.

Instrument Collection

There is an extensive collection of musical instruments, all of which are available for use by undergraduate, postgraduate and research students. These include:
 •  over 70 pianos
 •  all standard orchestral instruments
 •  extensive Percussion Studio, enabling the department to undertake most styles of music and to cover the percussion requirements for the University Orchestra, Wind Band, Brass Band, New Music Ensemble, Big Band, as well as the Percussion Ensemble. There is also an extensive library of percussion music consisting of solos, tutor books, compilations, ensemble material and recording Early music instruments including:
 •  2-manual French harpsichord, a copy of an original by Pascal Taskin (1764)
 •  1-manual French harpsichord, a copy of an original by Albert Delin (1750)
 •  1-manual Flemish harpsichord, a copy of an original by Moermans (1584)
 •  two Baroque violins, Baroque viola, Baroque cello, and a set of Baroque bows
 •  viols: two treble, two tenor, two bass
 •  recorders: Renaissance consort from descant to great bass; various Baroque recorders
 •  crumhorns - a consort
 •  cornett and four sackbuts built by Meinl of Germany - one alto, two tenor and one bass
 •  Renaissance flute
 •  Baroque guitar
 •  Renaissance and Baroque lutes
 •  Three practice continuo organs •  Extensive pop music resources, including drum kits, keyboards and amplifiers.

How much will it cost me?

The Government is introducing changes which mean that Undergraduate tuition fees may be able to rise with inflation (RPI-X) from September 2017. The University of Huddersfield intends to increase its fees if that is made possible. The increase would be in line with inflation (RPI-X, which is currently 2.8%) and would mean that the full-time tuition fee for home and EU undergraduates would rise from £9,000 to £9,250. All universities that qualify under the new Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), and fulfill the requirements of the Office for Fair Access (OFFA), would be able to increase fees in this way from September 2017 if the Government's plans do not change. Please note that the fee may also rise in subsequent years beyond 2017/18 by RPI-X. Tuition fees will cover the cost of your study at the University as well as charges for registration, tuition, supervision and examinations. For more information about funding, fees and finance for UK/EU students, including what your tuition fee covers, please see Fees and Finance. Please note that tuition fees for subsequent years of study may rise in line with inflation (RPI-X).

If you are an international student coming to study at the University of Huddersfield, please visit the International Fees and Finance pages for full details of tuition fees and support available.

Please email the Student Finance Office or call 01484 472210 for more information about fees and finance.

Course scholarships available – up to £3000. More details.

If you decide to apply for a course that includes a work placement, a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check may be required to enable you to undertake that placement in settings with children (e.g. within a School). Should the organisation you are going to be working in require one to be undertaken, the School will support you to apply for a check. Please note that there is a charge for the DBS check which is approximately £44.

Further study

Progression to a postgraduate course is dependent on successful completion of your undergraduate studies, there may also be minimum qualification requirements such as a first class or higher second (2.1) degree.Please check the course details to confirm this.

You may be interested in studying:

Music Performance Postgraduate Diploma

Music (MA by Research)

International

If you're an international student (including EU) you can check if you meet our entry requirements (both academic and English language) by visiting our country pages.

If you do not meet the entry requirements you can consider completing a degree preparation programme (if you are from a country outside of the EU) at the University's International Study Centre (ISC). You can call the ISC on +44 (0) 1273 339333 to discuss your options. You can also complete the online application form or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers.

If your English language is not at the required level (IELTS 6.0 overall), we have a range of Pre-Sessional English programmes that you can enrol on before starting your degree course. You will not need to take an IELTS test after completing one of our Pre-Sessional English programmes.

How to apply

Research community

The University of Huddersfield is home to a vibrant, diverse, international, and innovative group of music researchers. Our staff are recognised as leading figures in their fields, as evidenced by major commissions, performances, recordings, and publications. Our international postgraduate student community includes early career researchers who are already making significant contributions as composers, performers, technicians, engineers, and musicologists.

In the 2014 REF, 85% of music research at Huddersfield was judged to be Internationally Excellent, with 44% of the overall submission ranked as ‘World-Leading'. In addition to a strong profile of individual research outputs, Huddersfield's research environment for music was tied for 7th in the sector, alongside Edinburgh, Southampton, Royal Holloway and Cambridge. The impact of Huddersfield's music research was judged to be 5th among the 84 submissions in music, drama, dance and performing arts, receiving the second highest possible score. The ranking for impact acknowledges the breadth and reach of research at Huddersfield, with impact case studies encompassing innovations in music technology and audio software, historically-informed performance practice in early music, and intercultural exchange in music composition as a model for social change.

There are five research centres in Music Technology; the Centre for Research in New Music (CeReNeM), the Huddersfield Centre for Performance Research (HuCPeR), Centre for the Study of Music, Gender and Identity (MUGI), the Sound. Music.Image Collaboration Research Centre (SMIC) and the Popular Music Studies Research Group.

For more information, please refer to our research pages.

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