Engineering (PhD) 2017-18

This course also available for 2016-17 entryThis course also available for 2018-19 entry

Postgraduate study Fairs

The Research Degree

A PhD is the highest academic award for which a student can be registered. This programme allows you to explore and pursue a research project built around a substantial piece of work, which has to show evidence of original contribution to knowledge.

A PhD is a programme of research, culminating in the production of a large-scale piece of written work in the form of a research thesis that should not normally exceed 40,000 words (excluding ancillary data).

Completing a PhD can give you a great sense of personal achievement and help you develop a high level of transferable skills which will be useful in your subsequent career, as well as contributing to the development of knowledge in your chosen field.

You are expected to work to an approved programme of work including appropriate programmes of postgraduate study (which may be drawn from parts of existing postgraduate courses, final year degree programmes, conferences, seminars, masterclasses, guided reading or a combination of study methods).

You will be appointed a main supervisor who will normally be part of a supervisory team, comprising up to three members to advise and support you on your project.


Start date:
This research degree has multiple possible start dates including:
18 / 09 / 2017
08 / 01 / 2018
16 / 04 / 2018

Your start date may be decided in agreement with your supervisor.

Duration:

The maximum duration for a full time PhD is 3 years (36 months) with an optional submission pending (writing up period) of 12 months.

Sometimes it may be possible to mix periods of both full-time and part-time study.

Most students commence their studies in October at the beginning of each academic year.

Entry requirements

The normal level of attainment required for entry is:

A Master's degree or an honours degree (2:1 or above) or equivalent, in a discipline appropriate to the proposed programme to be followed, or appropriate research or professional experience at postgraduate level, which has resulted in published work, written reports or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment.

For applicants whose first language or language of instruction is not English you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum of IELTS 6.0 overall with no element lower than 5.5, will be considered acceptable, or equivalent.

Further information on international entry requirements and English language entry requirements is available on our international webpages

Contact:

Tel: +44 (0) 1484 473969
Email: researchdegrees@hud.ac.uk

Places available:

This is dependent upon supervisory capacity within the subject area

(this number may be subject to change)

Location:
Huddersfield, HD1 3DH

Apply now Book on an Open Day or Study Fair Order a prospectus Ask a question

What can I research?

Research topics available for this degree:

There are several research topics available for this degree. See below for full details of individual research areas including an outline of the topics, the supervisor, funding information and eligibility criteria.

Research titleSupervisorsApply
A mathematical approach to determination of the dimensions of the heat sources for accurate modelling of heat distribution within engineering structures
Outline
Temperature changes can affect the performance of mechanical system. Various applications in precision engineering, chemical engineering, pharmaceutical sciences etc, witness the thermal effect, so require control over the amount of generated heat through the process. This project will look into mathematical approaches to calculate parameters associated with the heat sources such as their dimensions, location, power etc. to effectively model their behaviour in the time domain. Variables to be considered include the material through which heat is being transmitted and the heat-flow influences from the geometry of the structure. The project outcomes will target the cross-disciplinary application areas where heat generation exists and affect the performance of systems Mathematical models will allow accurate prediction of the heat parameters. Their performance will be validated against experimental results the tests to obtain relevant data may be conducted on small to medium sized bespoke artefacts or even large structures such as machine tools. The proposal would be suitable for a mechanical engineer with good mathematical skills or an associated discipline, such as a mathematician or physicist wishing to work on practical challenges.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
A Semi-Analytical Approach to Determining Velocity Profiles in the Near to Middle Distance Behind A Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine
Outline
Wind farm efficiency is somewhat determined by turbine efficiency, which in tum depends upon wake effects. Turbines situated wholly or partially in the wake of leading turbines are severely restricted in their efficiency, according to size, wind speed and direction and spacing between turbines. The aim of the project is to create a semi-analytical model of air flow behind a horizontal axis wind turbine, principally for use by wind farm designers in the industry. Current models are either too crude to be of certain value or too sophisticated (or time­ consuming) to be incorporated into iterative turbine placement design schemes or software. The most common and crudest model still in use was devised in 1983. Applicants will need a sound Mechanical or Energy Engineering background and a good understanding of the near field aerodynamics of a horizontal axis wind turbine. The project requires a very numerate approach and a good background in applications of mathematics would also be required. For calibration and validation of the model a number of simulations using Computational Fluid Dynamics will be necessary and applicants should be well versed in this type of work, preferably using ANSYS Fluent or similar software.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
A systematic research on ultra-precision manufacturing of functional surfaces with embedded on-machine measurement system.
Outline
This research project's aim is to develop ultra-precision manufacturing with an embedded on-machine measurement system to the fabrication of functional surfaces. The machining technologies can be developed based on one of the following methods including single point diamond turning , fast-tool-servo, fly cutting and micro milling. The functional surfaces to be machined are free from and/or structured surface with various applications in optics. A typical case study will be focused on the fabrication of optical lenses. Simulation work will also be carried out in this project to find the optimised processing parameters. The selected PhD student will be trained to operate machine tools and other related measurement equipment. Applicants should hold an MSc research degree on mechanical engineering/informatics or expect to obtain an MSc degree before they start their PhD study in September. The applicant should have education background/working experience on metal cutting or control system and have publications (conferences/journals, paper/books chapter) in this research area.
Eligibility
Applicants should hold an MSc research degree on mechanical engineering/informatics or expect to obtain an MSc degree before they start their PhD study in September. The applicant should have education background/working experience on metal cutting or control system and have publications (conferences/journals, paper/books chapter) in this research area.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
A transmission electron microscopy study of the interaction between gas bubbles and dislocations in ion-implanted metals.
Outline
Structural nuclear reactor materials are subjected to high temperatures and bombardment with neutrons which gives rise to the development of extended defects such as dislocation lines and loops (due to agglomeration of point defects) as well as gas bubbles resulting from the combination of vacancies with gases produced by transmutation reactions. Using the MIAMI facility these processes are simulated using ion beams whilst imaging the materials at high magnification. The purpose of the project is to form a dislocation network in at least one example each of a body-centred cubic metal and a face-centred cubic metal together with helium bubbles (in the size range 2–10 nm) and then to study the interaction of the bubbles with the dislocations. Specifically the aim is to determine the influence of the dislocations on bubble mobility. Preliminary unpublished work on Fe and Cu has indicated that bubbles may become “tethered” to a dislocation yet still retain some limited mobility but this is a poorly understood phenomenon. The project will involve a systematic study of this interaction at a range of temperatures and may involve collaboration with colleagues in other institutions who perform atomistic computer modelling.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
A Web-based Digital Audio Workstation Using The Web Audio API.
Outline
The group has developed a system to allow a full digital audio workstation to be made accessible through the web. It uses HTML5, Canvas and the Web Audio API. This project is to understand and develop this work further to consider the following: 1. An interface for other devices (such as game controllers) to control sound synthesis and music parameters in real time. 2. The use of live image processing to control sound synthesis and music parameters in real time. Applicants should have some experience of programming, preferably in 1 or more of the following languages: HTML5, JavaScript, Java, C or C++. Knowledge of the Web Audio API is a distinct advantage. An interest in electronic music performance or composition would be desirable but not essential. Please note, applicants wishing to undertake this project as an MSc by Research will also be considered.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/

(No supervisors found for this project)

How to apply
Acoustic Mixing Based on Ultrasonic Cavitation
Outline
Acoustic mixing is one of the key techniques to mix or homogenize the suspended particles of one kind of liquid in another liquid which is often used in many applications especially in chemical engineering. The basic idea behind this technique is to take advantage of ultrasonic cavitation that is the formation of vapour bubbles in the region where the pressure of the liquid falls below its vapour pressure due to the ultrasound field. However the difficulty lies in how to control the strength of cavitation to ensure the mixing process is achieved quickly and evenly. This project aims to develop a novel and effective method to control the intensity and distribution of the ultrasound field generated by an ultrasonic transducer to dominate the intensity of the ultrasonic cavitation. In such a system the amount and speed of the bubbles generated by cavitation are in control hence giving the user full control over the speed and quality of the mixing or homogenizing according to required applications. This project is suitable for MSc and/or PhD levels of study. A successful candidate will have an academic background in engineering science or maths preferably with experience in mechanical or acoustical areas. Analytical and programming skills are desirable.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a First or Upper Second class honours degree or the overseas equivalent in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances a Lower Second class honours degree supplemented by a Masters degree or appropriate relevant work experience may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
Active Noise Cancellation in Ducts with Time-variant Flow
Outline
Active noise cancellation also known as active noise control (ANC) is a method to actively and adaptively generate a signal in order to cancel noise. In comparison with passive methods such as insulation and absorption ANC reduces the low-frequency noise more effectively without slowing down the flow. However most traditional ANC methods require an accurate estimation of the real secondary path i.e. the transfer function from the secondary source to the error sensor to ensure stable adaptive updating of the control filter. In this application large uncertainty of the real secondary path exists due to the rapid time-variant flow. It is difficult to obtain a relative accurate estimation of the secondary path. The inaccurate estimation will slow down the convergence of the control filter which will potentially result in howling (feedback). This project aims to develop a novel and robust ANC method to reduce the noise in ducts with rapid time-variant flows. It will focus on the analysis and experimental study of the time-variant flow noise in the ducts the development of a new robust ANC algorithm for noise reduction and the design of a functional ANC system. The results of this project will have industrial applications and this is likely to attract extra funding and collaboration. This project is suitable for MSc and/or PhD levels of study.«/p»«p»A successful candidate will have an academic background in engineering science or maths preferably with experience in mechanical or acoustical areas. Analytical and programming skills are desirable.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a First or Upper Second class honours degree or the overseas equivalent in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances a Lower Second class honours degree supplemented by a Masters degree or appropriate relevant work experience may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
Adaptive modification of the boundary conditions in Finite Element Analysis models based on live data feedback and machine learning
Outline
The way in which temperature change affects the performance of machine tools remains an unanswered challenge. There are several instances at which machine thermal conditions inevitably change from its current state such as machining itself, environmental conditions, development of air pockets during machining, production- intermittent processes, etc. To enable Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software to match and precisely simulate these time-variant boundary conditions, an interface link must be created between the FEA software and sensing or monitoring devices to allow live feedback of data to adapt the computation. This project aims to develop an interface link between the FEA software and external sensing devices using e.g. Python programming to enable the simulation of time-varying boundary conditions. To ensure the quality and usability of the captured data, optimisation, reduction and machine learning techniques will be developed and tested on different platforms, including high-performance computing (HPC) or graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated computing. The project would be suitable for a computer programmer with an interest in advanced engineering applications, or a mechanical/design engineer with good programming skills.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Advanced Analysis and Innovative Product Design.
Outline
Industrial competition is characterised by the desire for better quality, cheaper in price, and shorter in delivery time. A good design becomes essential. This project will resort to the innovative design methodology and the advanced computational quantification of the specific design leading to optimised outcome, where the thermal efficiency and high temperature strutural integrity will be investigated. Thus the project falls within energy theme.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Aerodynamic characterisation and design optimisation of vertical axis wind turbines for sustainable urban environments.
Outline
Renewable energy is an essential source for harnessing natural forces such as wind energy in an age which is very conscious of the environmental effects of burning fossil fuels, and where sustainability is an ethical norm. Therefore, the focus is currently on both the adequacy of long-term energy supply, as well as the environmental implications of particular sources. In that regard, the near certainty of costs being imposed on carbon dioxide emissions in developed countries has profoundly changed the economic outlook of clean energy sources. Wind turbines have vastly been developed in recent decades due to technology becoming more advanced. Since there is a continuous exhaustion of fossil fuels, it is of high interest with government encouragement to utilise wind technology. Wind turbines are currently advancing into cross-flow vertical axis operation, whereby research has shown a significant increase in performance compared to existing technologies. The need for sustainable energy sources becomes greater each year due to the continued depletion of fossil fuels and the resulting energy crisis. Solutions to this problem are potentially in the form of wind turbines, for sustainable urban environment, that have been receiving increased support. At present, a number of wind turbines have been developed that show significant increase in performance compared to existing technologies.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Analyzing Pulsed Laser Deposition of Thin Films Using Medium Energy Ion Scattering
Outline
The IIAA at the University of Huddersfield houses the UK Medium Energy Ion Scattering (MEIS) facility one of only a few such facilities in the world. Using an ion beam probe MEIS enables the investigation of the surface structure and properties of crystalline materials as well as the high resolution depth profiling of non-crystalline nanometer thin layers. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) utilizes a high-power pulsed laser focused onto a target made from the material to be deposited producing a plasma plume of the vaporized material which is then deposited onto a substrate. This is a versatile technique used in the semiconductor industry to create thin (nanometer thickness) homogenous layers. A new type of laser operating in the extreme-ultraviolet will generate a plasma plume with very different characteristics and has the potential to reduce substrate damage and increase the efficiency of the process. The aim of this project will be to investigate the use of new capillary discharge laser technology operating at 46.9nm for pulsed laser deposition of thin films. This investigation will use the MEIS facility at Huddersfield to analyze these novel PLD films in term of their composition uniformity and interface abruptness etc. by comparing the spectra with simulations
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
Application of Flameless Oxidation Combustion for Air transportation and Power Generation
Outline
Within the last ten years, novel combustor design - using a new form of combustion known as 'flameless oxidation' - has been suggested for either power generation, utility boilers or aero transport application. The term 'flameless oxidation' refers to the fact that no distinct flame is visible in this mode of combustion. This research aims to investigate the way that fuel and air mix and react during flameless oxidation in order to provide a better understanding of this mode of combustion and allow appropriate computational models to be developed to assist combustor design. Experimental and numerical tests will be conducted in model burners, which will identify the operational limits between conventional combustion and flameless oxidation and changes in the reaction process between the two models of combustion. The parameters will include air, fuel and exhaust gas recirculation flowrates, preheat air temperature and fuel type. Results from experimental measurements will be used to evaluate the performance of computational models for prediction of flameless oxidation combustion.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Application of non-diffracting beams for the measurement of surface topography.
Outline
This project will investigate the potential for using non-diffracting beams Bessel beams to generate high-dynamic range sensors for surface topography measurement. Bessel beams can be generated by a variety of methods and demonstrate key properties such as non-diffraction of the core over a limited range. Bessel beam probing for surfaces could get around the limitations of Gaussian beam optics where the depth-of-focus is reduces with increased lateral resolution. It is possible to produce a Bessel beam having a high intensity central core that propagates with much less spreading than a Gaussian beam having an equivalent beam waist. It is possible to increase the axial measurement range while still maintaining good lateral resolution effectively increasing the overall dynamic range of the sensor. This project will develop sensor technologies to harness Bessel beams for surface topography measurement with interferometry being the base technique. This project will require substantial practical laboratory activity including: the development of optical apparatus to generate Bessel beams development of interferometry based sensors. It will also require numerical simulation and ray-tracing to be carried out as supporting activities in order to aid the development of theoretical models to describe the principles of topography measurement using Bessel beams.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a First or Upper Second class honours degree or the overseas equivalent in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances a Lower Second class honours degree supplemented by a Masters degree or appropriate relevant work experience may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
Automated Composition of Popular Music
Outline
This project proposes to use a Genetic Algorithm to compose popular music tracks. The aim is to develop software that can compose music that is similar but different to a set of musical examples. For example, if the system was trained on a set of Beatles tracks then the system should compose a convincing Beatles-like track. The Genetic Algorithm’s search will be guided by a multiobjective fitness function. A key component of the work will be identifying and developing these objectives. Once developed, the fitness function will be “trainable” by analyzing existing popular music songs against the objectives in order to produce songs with similar characteristics. A hierarchical representation of the musical pieces will be required and this is proposed to be based on Schenkerian analysis. The use of a hierarchical representation will necessitate exploration of appropriate hierarchical crossover techniques. This proposal is different from much current research as it makes no attempt to model human compositional processes or perceptual/neurological capabilities and treats music as patterns where the value of patterns is determined by the previous success of similar patterns. The project will use MIDI or MusicXML files. Music arrangement, mixing and production are beyond the scope of this project
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
Characterisation of Multi-component and Multi- phase flows through complex industrial systems.
Outline
Multi component and multiphase mixture flows take place through a number of industrial stems and contribute to a number of processes. Some practical examples of such flows are solid-liquid flow, solid-gas flow, solid-liquid-gas flow, oil - water flow etc. Some of the most common industries where these flows are encountered are Nuclear Industry, Mining Industry, and Chemical Industry etc. The operation, monitoring and control of these flows need detailed knowledge about the flow characteristics of individual components and individual phases. The problem becomes especially complex if the flows are taking place through complex geometries for example helical pipes, elbows valves etc. Through this project novel techniques will be developed to understand local flow features associated with individual components and phases and integrating this information to develop design tools/standards for these processes. The special computational/experimental techniques developed will enable quantification of interphase interaction mechanism. It is expected that the work carried out under this project will enable removal of empiricism embedded in design methodologies to a large extent. It will further allow development of methodologies to trouble free operation and energy use optimisation for such systems.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Characterisation of the dynamic behaviour of vortex rings to optimise the cooling process in a prilling tower.
Outline
A prilling tower is an integral part of any fertilizer plant. A hot fluid (normally urea) is sprayed from a nozzle at the top of the tower forming droplets of urea. These droplets fall under the action of gravity, releasing their energy content, and hence, forming solid prills of urea, which is extensively used as a fertilizer. It is often seen that a lot of the prills formed at the base of the tower doesn't have enough strength to remain in the form of a prill; hence, they disintegrate into powder, wasting an excessive amount of the product. This happens because of ineffective cooling in the tower. The current research work will look into the dynamic of vortex rings for effective cooling purposes within a prilling tower. Vortex rings are inherent in nature and have been a topic of interest for almost a millennium. The urge to utilise vortex rings for multi-purpose applications, such as in cooling of urea droplets in a prilling tower, has led to the development of various types of vortex rings. However, in-depth analysis of the flow phenomena associated with vortex rings is still very little known. This study will investigate the dynamics of a vortex ring's generation, propagation and its ultimate dissipation within a prilling tower. The effect of the geometrical, flow and fluid parameters on the rolling-up of the fluid's shear layers will be analysed using a number of analytical, experimental and numerical techniques. It is expected that this study will result into a practical device that can be installed on the top of the prilling tower, which can enhance the cooling process, hence substantially reducing the waste powder.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Computer simulation of railway vehicle dynamics
Outline
This project aims to establish methods for using the vast amount of data (big data) that is now available from vehicle and track monitoring to improve the way in which computer simulations can predict the behaviour of railway vehicles as track and vehicle systems degrade. Methods for incorporating full 3D descriptions of track and vehicle component geometries and of key parameters of other components such as track stiffness need to be investigated, appropriate methods chosen for incorporating and processing these and for analyzing and interpreting the results. Key skills will be mechanical modelling, computer simulation and data handling and processing.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
Condition Monitoring of Power Systems Insulation using Software Defined Radio Technology
Outline
Insulation voids in HV electrical transmission equipment have lower permittivity than the surrounding dielectric and are, therefore, subject to higher electric field strength. Furthermore, the voids have lower dielectric strength than the surrounding insulation. This combination of circumstances can result in electrical discharge within the void without a corresponding discharge in the bulk of the insulation. This is referred to as partial discharge (PD). If left unchecked pressure cycling in the void due to heating and the production of ozone (and other acidic products), may result in gradual enlargement of the void and, eventual, catastrophic flashover with associated loss of expensive equipment and even greater loss in regulatory fines due to disconnection of customers. Since the discharges within the void represent short periods of charge acceleration broadband electromagnetic energy is radiated (mainly in the 10s – 100s MHz region of the spectrum). If this radiation is detected it can be used to monitor the severity of PD and trigger action to avoid catastrophic plant failure. The proposed project will examine the potential of recently developed software defined radio (SDR) technologies for monitoring, locating and diagnosing insulation faults from the measurement and analysis of PD signals.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
Constitutive modelling of non-metallic reinforcement for cast Aluminium materials
Outline
The proposal is to investigate how non-metallic reinforcement added into aluminium alloys can be used to its maximum effect. The addition may be into molten cast aluminium, or into semi solid “squeeze compression moulded” aluminium, where the metal is treated more like a plastic and worked in a semi-molten state. In either case, treating the material more like a polymer composite than a metal allows creation of orthotropic qualities which can be used to optimise designs, aligning the maximum material strengths with the loading directions. This will allow reduction of mass, and more importantly, inertia in highly stressed components such as compressor impellers, enabling better transient response. Characterisation of these materials following a range of processing methods will allow development of constitutive modelling techniques which will capture the behaviour of the material in specific design situations. These modelling techniques can then be validated against test in a range of highly directionally loaded situations using realistic operating conditions. Generic design rules for optimal design of such components can then be developed. Applicants should have a knowledge of materials and Finite Element Analysis.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Crack resistant refractory carbide-based ceramics
Outline
Refractory carbide-based ceramics will be synthesised by Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD) at ambient temperatures and by uniaxial hot pressing of reactive powders at temperatures around 2000°C. The composition, atomic bonding and crystalline structure will be characterised using electron and x-ray microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. We also intend to use micro Raman for investigation of the grapheme phases found in these ceramics. Mechanical properties will be measured using a high-temperature nanomechanical platform. The project will also utilise the University's ion beam irradiation and analysis facilities as well as benefitting from our well-established collaborations with colleagues at Leeds (UK), Poitiers (France), Kiev (Ukraine), Uppsala (Sweden), Limeric (Ireland) and Aachen (Germany). National facilities , such as the Diamond Light Source, will be used to gain precise understanding of atomic arrangements to compliment the characterisation work performed at Huddersfield and through our existing network of collaborators. Finally, the performance of the synthesised ceramics will be tested in extreme environments relevant to real-world applications through our industrial partners including Tier Coatings Ltd (UK), Reliance Precision Ltd (UK) and Hauzer Techno Coating BV (Netherlands)
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Dataflow programming and FPGA acceleration of computationally-intensive algorithms
Outline
The aim of this project is to research the efficiency of FPGA computing compared to CPU/GPU computing, using a novel approach in the form of cross-platform implementation using OpenCL. OpenCL aims to remove the difficulties that lie within cross-platform programming by using a framework that allows a single design to be implemented on either CPU, GPU, DSP or FPGA. It also encourages the use of heterogeneous systems (for example CPU+FPGA) to improve development time and performances. The proposed approach is to investigate the efficiency of the CPU, GPU and FPGA platforms through the use of typical distributed computing applications within the fields of engineering and science, with emphasis on computation time, overall development time and energy consumption. In this project resources available in the School of Computing and Engineering will be used: QGG Campus grid, CPU and GPU clusters, and FPGA hardware, with possible access to Hartree centre - Maxeler FPGA equipment.
Eligibility
The normal level of attainment required for entry is: A Master's degree or an honours degree (2:1 or above) or equivalent, in a discipline appropriate to the proposed programme to be followed, or appropriate research or professional experience at postgraduate level, which has resulted in published work, written reports or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Development of a Computational Fluid Dynamics based model for online monitoring of pollution leak for risk mitigation
Outline
Infrastructure systems consist of a number of sub-systems carrying a wide variety of solid-liquid-gaseous materials. Failure of one of the sub-systems may result in release of these materials in an uncontrolled manner. Risk mitigation strategies need to be designed keeping variety of leak scenarios. Furthermore, an array of sensors is needed to provide dispersion characteristics through a well-developed formulation. The information provided through such methods is limited in scope and accuracy in the present work a CFD based solution algorithm will be developed that integrates pre-developed flow scenarios with sensor array information to provide qualitative and quantitative pollutant dispersion characteristics. The developed system will be capable of informing real time pollution dispersion characteristics and will help in developing risk mitigation strategies.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Development of an Innovative Inverse Design of Optimal Centrifugal Pumps for Multiphase Flow Applications.
Outline
The primary aim of this research based study is to develop a cutting edge design tool for industrial multiphase flow centrifugal pumps. Currently inter-dependence of geometrical parameters of a pump with the flow and fluid variables is not fully established through complex flow geometries like pumps. Through this research we wish to establish uniquely this dependence resulting in a step change in development of unique design methodologies like inverse design methods for various types of Centrifugal pumps, handling multiphase fluids used in Oil and Gas applications, leading to significant improvement in their performance and Life Cycle, and to promote green energy technology in Mechanical and Turbo-machinery applications. EEERG is actively involved in large number of mechanical industries in this area and through this collaboration a wider international network of supporting companies and institutions using this methodology will be created. A greater understanding is thus required for wider utilisation of inverse design approaches in a range of existing and emerging engineering disciplines. The specific objectives of this study are: 1) to develop novel integrated approaches to the application of inverse design methods 2) to exploit advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based strategies, in combination with 3D CAD modelling, to create resources for teaching and public outreach, and providing impressive and interactive demonstrations of inverse design success.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Development of an Open Source Computational Fluid Dynamics (OS-CFD) based Diagnostic Tool for Centrifugal Compressors in Oil and Gas Applications
Outline
The primary aim of this research project is the development of an Open Source Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based Diagnostic Tool for Centrifugal Compressors used in Oil & Gas sector around the globe. Open Source CFD is a C++ toolbox for the development of customized numerical solvers and pre/post-processing utilities for the solution of continuum mechanics (CFD) problems Open Source CFD is becoming more and more popular both in the industry and the academia because of the flexibility it offers in developing industrial specific diagnostic capabilities that currently cannot be done with commercial CFD software. Inter-dependence of geometrical parameters of a centrifugal compressor with the fluid and flow parameters is not fully established as yet. Through this research study we wish to uniquely establish this dependence by using Open Source CFD. Currently most of the flow analysis work/research in the Oil & Gas applications is conducted through commercial CFD packages and hence the use of Open Source CFD will revolutionise the way this sector will use CFD solvers for diagnostic and maintenance problems. Open Source CFD possesses the capability to not only predict the complex flow phenomena within Centrifugal Compressors; it has the ability to tune the CFD solver to any specific applications. Hence bespoke Open Source CFD codes/packages can be developed for Centrifugal Compressors which can lead towards global acceptance of Open Source CFD in Oil & Gas sector for diagnostic purposes opening new doors for further collaborations/funding.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a First or Upper Second class honours degree or the overseas equivalent in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances a Lower Second class honours degree supplemented by a Masters degree or appropriate relevant work experience may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
Development of full-duplexing techniques in multi-user, multi-antenna set up in 5G communication networks
Outline
Current communications systems operate in half-duplex mode as it is generally believed that it is not possible to transmit and receive at the same time in wireless networks due to the strong self-interference created by the transmitter at its own receiver. Recent research has shown that the strong self-interference can be completely cancelled using analog and digital interference cancellation techniques to enable full-duplex communication. The immediate benefit of full-duplex communication is the doubling of spectral efficiency that makes a significant part of radio spectrum available for new applications and services. While the feasibility of full-duplex radios has recently been demonstrated for standalone wireless links, the challenges in the implementation of full-duplexing in 5G communication networks are many folds. Firstly, 5G communication networks involve multi-user communication in infrastructure or ad hoc mode. Secondly, multi-antenna communication is intimately linked to the ability to increase the spectral efficiency of a link without increasing the total transmission power, as shown by the advent of MIMO (Multiple Input Multiple Output) systems. This project will investigate full-duplexing techniques in multi-user, multi-antenna communication set up in 5G communication networks.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Development of functional composite material for energy applications
Outline
The aim of this project is to develop new composite materials with enhanced heat transfer and long lasting super hydrophobic surface properties. This will favour dropwise condensation to take place on a surface and further enhance heat transfer and energy efficiency. The technology can also be applied to heat transfer, power generation, water harvesting, dehumidification, chemical production and water desalination. The development strategy will include evaluation of polymer, ceramic and metal materials and at the same time, when optimising physic-chemical properties, mechanical strength and machinability will be considered.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply
How to apply
Development of High Temperature Impact Resistant polymers, and mathematical modelling techniques for their analysis
Outline
Most polymers are limited in their scope of use as a replacement for metals due to the differences in material properties such as strength, thermal expansion, creep, brittleness etc. In order to achieve the required properties, the components need to be redesigned to take the different material properties into account. To allow accurate design analysis, these properties need to be characterised and suitable mathematical models defined. The project will include characterisation of materials with suitable bulk properties to include the variable properties which can be used to improve the performance of the end product, such as polymer chain or reinforcing strand alignment. If a suitable constitutive model is not available, then the relevant mathematical modelling will need to be undertaken to provide the basis for design analysis. This will need to take into account the proposed manufacturing method, which may have influences on the final localised properties of the material. The models developed can then be used to design components which will be tested under typical operating conditions to validate their suitability for replacement of metal components. The student will need a thorough understanding of polymeric materials and non-linear modelling techniques, and preferably some experience of test methodologies.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Development of non-invasive flow metering system for the single phase and multiphase flow measurement.
Outline
In the oil-gas fields, slurry flow, gas-in-water two phase flows, and oil-gas-water three phase flows, are frequently encountered. Generally, the measurement of volumetric flow rate for each phase is of most interest, especially in subsea oil-gas production applications, where it is essential to obtain oil, water and gas flow rates in inclined oil wells. The problem of how to accurately measure these flow parameters for such complicated flow phenomena, without using expensive test separators and intrusive techniques, is a major challenge for the industry. Most conventional multiphase flow meters have severe limitations regarding types of flow and their measurement reliability. Some useful techniques containing radioactive sources are available, but they are expensive and potentially harmful to humans. Thus, the new developed system will be capable of measuring the local volume fraction, local distribution and local velocity distributions of each phase based on tomographic techniques, that do not contain a radioactive source.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply
How to apply
Development of novel calibration algorithms and phase calculation methods for stereo phase measurement optical deflectometry.
Outline
Three-dimensional (3D) sensing for specular objects is required in many applications in research and industry. And most of the surfaces are high precision, inconvenient to measure. A practical method to measure specular surfaces is phase measurement deflectometry. The proposed research project aims to explore high accurate calibration algorithms and phase calculation algorithms of stereo phase measurement optical deflectometry system for high precision fast measurement of freeform and complex structured specular surfaces. By combination of the new calibration method and the novel stereo measurement algorithm developed in this project the measurement accuracy of phase measurement deflectometry could be improved for one order from a few hundreds nanometres global accuracy for specular flat surface1,2 to a few tens of nanometres global accuracy for specular freeform smooth surfaces. The proposed stereo optical deflectometry system has potential for on-line measurement of the whole topography of freeform or structured specular surfaces object which have high difference in height. Compared to the current relative researches in the field of optical deflectometry calibration, the proposed calibration algorithms will evidently reduce calibration error for a single camera measurement system by introducing active phase target and also by combining the holistic optimization algorithm to increase relative position accuracy of the components in deflectometry system.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Development of Numerical Methods for Multiscale Transports in Reservoirs
Outline
A displacement fluid is injected to displace oil and/or gas from reservoirs. The displacing fluid and oil or gas, flow through and around matrix of porous medium, fractures and vugs or cavities between the injector and the producer. This process is challenging to model as the flow passages can range from nanometres when the fluids flow through the matrix, to metres or kilometres through fractures and vugs and kilometres in the injector and in the producer. The multiscale (nanometres to kilometres) nature of the flow passages is a significant challenge to model. Efficient methods that span the whole range of length-scales is very useful to make accurate predictions of the transport phenomena. In addition to this, the flow can be single-phase or multi-phase (liquid-liquid, liquid-gas, liquid-gas-particulate), reactive or non-reactive, etc; this adds significant complexities to the development of accurate and efficient numerical methods. The aim of this project is to develop numerical methods which allow for the modelling of large changes in the physical dimensions while the transport processes are still in the continuum regime possibly with slip boundary conditions.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Development of Numerical Methods for Solar Chimney
Outline
Solar chimney is a passive solar collector where air collected at the base of a tall chimney is heated up, while it travels horizontally through the base, gaining speed as the air flows toward the centre of the chimney. This hot air then rises through a vertical tower and exits back into the environment. Turbines are placed at the base of the chimney, before the tower, generating power due to the motion of the air flow. The aim of this project is to investigate the efficiency and accuracy of different numerical models in the modelling of the solar chimney. The numerical models will be improved by introducing additional effects to capture the special needs of air flow through these structures. Accurate radiation heat transfer models will be implemented to improve the accuracy of the numerical models.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Device-to-device (D2D) Communication Assisted Internet of Everything Ecosystem (DCASE)
Outline
Internet of Everything (loE) has been emerging as the next evolutionary stage of Internet of Things (loT). Compared to loT, loE will not only connect devices and people but also process and leverage connectivity among data, devices, and people to add value. This high heterogeneity of devices and interaction imposes severe challenges to loEs because of their diverse functionality and offered service as loEs are constrained in terms of end-to-end delay, processing power, and battery life. 020 communications enable smart mobile devices to communicate and transmit data directly to each other via a D2D link. The proposed solution of assisting loE ecosystem with 020 help solve loE's constraints smartly. D2D will form cloudlets close to nearby loE things and allow all the computationally-intensive data processing and big-data storage away from loE devices. This will reduce end-to-end delays, improve processing capability and battery life of loEs. The assistance of loE ecosystem with D2D will not always be a win-win situation as interference between loE ecosystems and operating D2D devices may be significantly enhanced, especially when using unlicensed spectrum. New dynamic interference managemenUresource allocation algorithms will be designed in this project to assist loE ecosystem with D2D.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Standard University deadlines apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Emission reduction in diesel engine by filtering microdroplet water contamination.
Outline
Aim of the project is to reduce Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) and other emission (THC, NMHC, CO, PM) of engines powered by biodiesel / diesel blends (referred to as diesel) by increasing water/diesel separation ratio in the filtration process. Micro-droplets of water («10 μm) can significantly deteriorate combustion process and currently it is a great challenge to separate water droplets lower than 5 μm. Elimination of water contamination will reduce emissions, improve combustion and performance as well as decrease corrosion of engine elements and potential failure risk. Due to carbon emission restrictions from fossil fuels, the use of biodiesel mixed with conventional diesel is steadily increasing. Biodiesel is a carbon-neutral alternative to conventional fossil fuel, which has several environmentally beneficial properties. Unfortunately, it is prone to contamination by water. Therefore filtering is of great importance. This project will analyse the water content in biodiesel fuel and filtration methods will be studied in detail using both experimental and numerical techniques. The objective will be to understand the physical mechanism of dispersed water particle coalescence to enhance diesel /water separation, improve engine performance and reduce overall engine emission. This project is eligible for Fee Waiver Scholarship, contact.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Emission reduction in diesel engine by fuel filtering
Outline
The aim of the project is to reduce Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) and other emission (THC, NMHC, CO, PM) of engines powered by biodiesel I diesel blends by controlling water/diesel separation ratio in the filtration process. Micro-droplets of water («10 µm) can significantly influence combustion process and currently it is a great challenge to separate water droplets lower than 10 µm. Elimination of water contamination can reduce emissions, improve combustion and performance as well as decrease corrosion of engine elements and potential failure risk. Due to carbon emission restrictions from fossil fuels, the use of biodiesel mixed with conventional diesel is steadily increasing. Biodiesel is a carbon-neutral alternative to conventional fossil fuel, which has several environmentally beneficial properties. Unfortunately, it is prone to contamination by water, therefore, filtering is of great importance. This project will analyse the water content in biodiesel fuel and filtration methods will be studied in detail using both experimental and numerical techniques. The objective will be to understand the physical mechanism of dispersed water particle coalescence to enhance diesel /water separation improve engine performance and reduce overall engine emission.
Eligibility
The normal level of attainment required for entry is: A Master's degree or an honours degree (2:1 or above) or equivalent, in a discipline appropriate to the proposed programme to be followed, or appropriate research or professional experience at postgraduate level, which has resulted in published work, written reports or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Employing additive layer manufacturing techniques to improve the prognosis for patients with complex wounds
Outline
The project will investigate the use of 3D printing techniques with the integration of 3D scanning technology to establish the viability of patient specific wound dressings. The project will be multidisciplinary such that modern wound management systems employ trans dermal drug delivery techniques to provide antibiotic and analgesic therapy if this can be incorporated into 3D print media with flexible material properties it gives rise to a step change in the way large area and complex wounds can be managed. Objectives:Investigate a reliable method of scanning anatomy and converting the data for use in 3D solid modelling CAD packages; Investigate 3D printing of flexible materials which are anatomically congruent; Incorporate trans dermal drug delivery into the 3D print technology; Complete lab based trials to determine viability.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a First or Upper Second class honours degree or the overseas equivalent in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances a Lower Second class honours degree supplemented by a Masters degree or appropriate relevant work experience may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
EPSRC iCASE Studentship in Smart Rolling Stock Maintenance Depot
Outline
This research project aims to investigate the feasibility of using Autonomous Intelligent Systems (AIS) in the decision-making, control, planning and optimisation of rolling stock maintenance activities, in order to make effective use of rolling stock and depot resources. The potential impacts and benefits of using AIS in rail vehicle maintenance includes improved utilisation of infrastructure and resources, improved safety, more accurate and timely maintenance planning and control, and an improved response to changes in, for example, vehicles, staff, equipment availability, safety regulations and standards. Longer term, the research will link automated inspection and remote condition monitoring systems, remaining life prediction algorithms and robotics, to revolutionise rail vehicle maintenance, delivering a smart maintenance depot with autonomous support from inspection to completed maintenance.
Eligibility
Applicants should hold or expect to obtain a Master's degree or an Honour’s degree (2:1 or above) or equivalent, in a discipline appropriate to the proposed programme to be followed, or appropriate research or professional experience at postgraduate level, which has resulted in published work, written reports or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment. This studentship is open to all UK or EU citizens, resident in the UK for at least three years.
Funding
This scholarship is renewable for up to three years, subject to satisfactory annual performance and progression review, and will provide tuition fees and a three year, tax-free stipend (subject to annual increase) of £14,553 per year (for 2017/18) payable every four weeks.
Deadline
The closing date for the receipt of completed applications is 30 June 2017 (23.59, BST).
How to apply
Estimation of contaminant transport in operation theatres
Outline
The flow field parameters in the operating theatre and the adjoining rooms are carefully controlled through purpose built ventilation system. The pressure velocity and temperature values in such rooms are decided based on comfort physiological and hygienic requirements. The high level ventilation system performance is vital for efficient and un-interrupted use of these facilities. In this project a novel two layer ventilation system will be used for investigating its efficacy in providing ideal operating environment in near patient and away patient regions. The local variation in flow parameters will be estimated through state of the art computational fluid dynamic simulations. The field data will be obtained through collaborators for validation of CFD predictions. Finally an adaptive multilayer ventilations system will be developed and tested which will be able to satisfy diverse operating room requirements seamlessly.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
Fibre reinforced rare earth magnets
Outline
This project aims to produce rare earth permanent magnets which are reinforced with ceramic fibres. Rare earth magnets are manufactured by sintering which leaves them with low mechanical tensile strength. When used in electric machine rotors, the magnets have to be guarded against tensile stresses to prevent failure. This compromises performance and complicates the rotor manufacturing process. A reinforced magnet would remove these issues. The project will investigate manufacturing processes which allow for the introduction of the fibres and develop analytical tools to predict the mechanical and magnetic properties of the composite material. These analytical tools will be validated with data from experimental work which will also investigate failure mechanisms.
Eligibility
A Master's degree or an honours degree (2:1 or above) or equivalent, in a discipline appropriate to the proposed programme to be followed, or appropriate research or professional experience at postgraduate level, which has resulted in published work, written reports or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Foil backed aerodynamic bearings for automotive turbocharger applications.
Outline
In this project the use of aerodynamic bearings to support the rotor shaft in automotive turbochargers will be investigated. The proposed bearing is supported by a metal foil structure when the shaft rotation is insufficient to generate the aerodynamic forces required to make the bearing self-supporting. The project will include: • Investigation of the operational requirements for automotive turbocharger rotor bearings comprising load, stiffness and damping characteristics, operating conditions including temperature, shaft speed, gas and inertial loading and importantly, bearing and shaft sizes; •Development of the multi-physics numerical models required to simulate the aerodynamic effect, the interaction of the generated air film with the metal foil support structure and the damping characteristics provided by friction between the components of the foil support structure; •Generation of experimental data to validate the numerical models including the design and manufacture of a bearing test rig; •Production of characteristic load, stiffness and damping curves for foil backed aerodynamic bearings using the validated numerical model; •Use of a constrained optimization approach to identify the range of feasible bearing designs for automotive applications; •Modification of an existing hydrodynamic turbocharger bearing housing to use an example aerodynamic bearing and demonstrate the bearing’s feasibility on an engine test bed;
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Functional surface design - optimisation for drag reduction and enhanced heat transfer
Outline
The aim of the project is to develop a framework for functional surface design, which will be used for two case studies on surface texture optimisation for drag reduction in the transport industry and in surface design for continuous dropwise condensation process, to significantly increase heat transfer. The surface design framework will be based on the Lattice Boltzmann method. The main innovation in the research will be to use surface hydrophobicity and texture to lower drag, and achieve continuous dropwise condensation process which will have the potential to increase heat transfer rate comparing to filmwise condensation. This research will involve international collaboration with the group at University of Valenciennes in France who specialise in hierarchical surface manufacturing methods. Research will involve mainly development of numerical and analytical methods and models which will be tested numerically on a new HPC facility at Huddersfield (Ascella lnfiniband Cluster) and also experimental validation of developed surfaces in Huddersfield and in Valenciennes (France).
Eligibility
The normal level of attainment required for entry is: A Master's degree or an honours degree (2:1 or above) or equivalent, in a discipline appropriate to the proposed programme to be followed, or appropriate research or professional experience at postgraduate level, which has resulted in published work, written reports or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Health Monitoring of Coupling using Acoustic Emissions
Outline
Couplings are the key devices to transmit power between shafts in engineering. Failure of coupling leads to the loss of power which can result in severe damage to machine and huge loss of production in critical applications. Present maintenance practice of coupling is generally based on regular visual inspection by stopping the machine which is difficult to perform in many continuous operating applications. Furthermore the conventional inspection is unlikely to detect the coupling failures at early stage so as to avoid catastrophic disaster and allow maintenance to be planned in advance. This project aims to develop a non-contact system using acoustic emission technology to monitor the health of couplings during their operation. Areas such as non-intrusive sensing advanced digital signal processing finite element analysis and diagnostic modelling will be explored. As an application-oriented research the developed system may be applied to engineering practice and further industrial funding may be attracted. This project is suitable for MSc and/or PhD levels of study. A successful candidate will have an academic background in engineering science or maths preferably with experience in mechanical or acoustical areas. Analytical and programming skills are desirable.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a First or Upper Second class honours degree or the overseas equivalent in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances a Lower Second class honours degree supplemented by a Masters degree or appropriate relevant work experience may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
High strength lightweight thermally insulating composites with ballistic protection capability
Outline
This project will develop a family of lightweight composite materials capable of being manufactured in complex shapes that are thermally and electrically insulating at high temperatures and deliver a high level of ballistic impact protection for applications as varied as turbocharger housings, high speed electric motor casings, manufacturing process equipment and lightweight body armour. This work will form the basis for future investigations into high performance intelligent materials with additional functionality, i.e. sensing capability and/or self-repair. A lightweight, thermally/electrically insulating material that is easily formable and capable of operating across a wide range of temperatures can be applied across a number of industry sectors, including automotive (turbocharger components), electrical (insulating, low loss motor housings) and process equipment (reactor vessels, food preparation equipment) as well as military applications. In many cases, the requirement is for a casing or housing that protects the internal or external space from impact by high energy objects. These may be the result of a catastrophic failure of a rotor (in the case of a turbine or motor) or impact by external objects (as a result of an explosion in a processing plant or military ordnance).
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
High temperature 3D fabrics for ballistic containment
Outline
Ballistic containment of high speed particles is a requirement for many rotating machines (aero engines, turbochargers, motors) in case of rotor failure. In aerospace applications, ballistic "jackets" are used, to prevent any engine parts escaping through the casing and striking the fuselage, however these are made from 20 fabrics where the seams present potential failure locations. For smaller applications with complex geometry a 3D construction which minimises the number of seams is required. The closer proximity of the jacket to the component also requires a higher temperature capability. Fibres will play an important role in the structure mechanics of such a jacket and the structural properties are often dependant on the fibre type, yam construction and positioning within the material structure. Development of a jacket of this type will require formulation of mathematical methods of representing complex fabric formations and their behaviour on impact from a projectile. The yam will need to have properties capable of surviving the challenging environments which the application is likely to encounter. The jacket design then needs to be translated to a textile preform pattern which can be manufactured. Applicants should have a knowledge of materials and textile manufacturing processes.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
High Temperature Phase change materials for turbine temperature control
Outline
In turbine housings, the peak temperatures only occur over small sections of the operating cycle. The proposal is to develop lightweight turbine housings based on sheet steel casings enclosing a phase change material, which absorb the energy during the high temperature excursions, thus protecting the steel housing. An added benefit would be that when the temperature dropped, the energy absorbed would be released back into the turbine, improving efficiency there as well. Research needs to be undertaken into determining suitable phase change materials for this purpose, and how they can be incorporated into the challenging environment necessitated by the application. Applicants should have a knowledge of materials and Finite Element Analysis.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
High-Performance Computing Security Framework
Outline
Large-scale HPC cluster systems are finding increasing deployment in academic, research, and commercial settings, hence securing the HPC infrastructure is an important task. There are many security threats coming from both the Internet and internal networks. It is crucial to introduce an adequate level of security to the infrastructure, to prevent an unauthorised access to the HPC resources and avoid loss of valuable data. The aim of this project is to investigate the security issues in HPC systems, and devise a framework suitable for securing HPC cluster systems in Higher Education and research institutions. The challenge is to secure internal distributed resources against unauthorised access while permitting easy access by legitimate users, to coordinate security across different node platforms and different specialised function nodes (there is a separation of nodes into 'head nodes', 'compute nodes', 'storage nodes', and 'management nodes'), and to maintain the integrity of all nodes since many nodes share identical configurations. This framework should provide coordination between security domains on campus and between institutions when resources are shared across multiple organisations. It should address the security issues posed by the high-bandwidth connections, extensive computational power, massive storage capacity, and should enable process monitoring, network port scanning and traffic analysis.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Hospital Noise Analysis and Visualisation.
Outline
Environmental noise levels in hospitals are exceedingly high and often exceed recommended World Health Organisation levels. Published research suggests that between 30-50% of people admitted to hospital suffer from significant sleep disturbance. Patients are especially in need of sleep for its restorative properties and disturbed sleep is linked to negative mental and physical well-being. An existing project will collect Sound Pressure Level (SPL) meter data from a local hospital over a four week period. The SPL meters will collect more data than will be analysed by the existing project. The existing project will only analyse broadband peak night time noise level, broadband night time equivalent continuous noise level, proportion of night that is noisy and length of longest unbroken quiet night time period. The first two measures are standard noise measurements and the latter two are obvious measures in relation to sleep disturbance. This project will apply more detailed analysis in both frequency and time resolution. Additionally it will seek to develop and apply existing noise annoyance models to the hospital SPL data to better identify noise that is most likely to disturb patients’ sleep. Visualisations will be developed in HTML5 and associated APIs to allow exploration of the noise data.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Hydrodynamic characterisation of hydraulic capsule pipelines for on-shore and off-shore applications.
Outline
Scarcity of fossil fuels and rapid escalation in the energy prices around the world is affecting efficiency of established modes of cargo transport within the transportation industry. Extensive research is being carried out on improving efficiency of existing modes of cargo transport, as well as to develop alternative means of transporting goods. One such alternative method can be through the use of energy contained within fluid flowing in pipelines in order to transfer goods from one place to another. Although the concept of using fluid pipelines for transportation purposes has been in practice for more than a millennium now, the detailed knowledge of the flow behaviour in such pipelines is still a subject of active research. This is due to the fact that most of the studies conducted on transporting goods in pipelines are based on experimental measurements of global flow parameters, and only a rough approximation of the local flow behaviour within these pipelines has been reported. With the emergence of sophisticated analytical tools and the use of high performance computing facilities being installed throughout the globe, it is now possible to simulate the flow conditions within these pipelines and gain a better understanding of the underlying flow phenomena.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Inverse design of complex flow handling systems.
Outline
The project looks at using inverse problem approach to develop complex flow handling systems such as pipings, valves, radiators, heat exchanges for better effieciency, operation and reliability. These fluid handling systems may be handling single or multiphase flow systems. State of the art numerical, analytical and experimental techniques will be used for such purposes.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Inverse design of innovative electro-mechanical systems.
Outline
The project looks at using inverse problem approach to design various electro-mechanical components used in industrial applications such as wind turbines with generators, marine turbines with power units, wave energy systems with power units for better efficiency, operation and reliability. State of the art numerical, analytical and experimental techniques will be used for such purposes.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Inverse design of innovative renewable energy systems
Outline
This project looks at using inverse problem approach to develop renewable energy systems such as wind turbines, marine turbines, wave energy systems, thermosyphons for better efficiency, operation and reliability. State of the art numerical, analytical and experimental techniques will be used for such purposes.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Inverse design of turbo-machines.
Outline
The project looks at using inverse problem approach to develop turbo-machines such as compressors, turbines and pumps for better efficiency, operation and reliability. State of the art numerical, analytical and experimental techniques will be used for such purposes.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Inverse design of wind turbine blades’ surfaces and shape for ice accretion resistance
Outline
This project will deliver a code for inverse design of blade surface for different climatic conditions. The wind turbine systems incorporating these blades will be expected to be effective in extreme weather conditions. The main benefit of this work will be to increase the efficiency of operation of wind turbines in cold regions which will also contribute to the improvement of turbine safety and lifetime.
Eligibility
The normal level of attainment required for entry is: A Master's degree or an honours degree (2:1 or above) or equivalent, in a discipline appropriate to the proposed programme to be followed, or appropriate research or professional experience at postgraduate level, which has resulted in published work, written reports or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Investigation of High Temperature Material and Component Integrity.
Outline
This is about the high temperature structural integrity in power generation. It falls within energy and material themes. Recently, a prototype dedicated Finite Element Software has been developed by PhD researchers at Huddersfield. This project is to further develop and apply this in-house software to predict behaviour and life of high temperature welds, and provide solution for estimation of it's life time and/or optimising its design, which will demonstrate firmly the research capability to industries.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Investigations into the influence of audio-visual interaction on the quality of experience in virtual reality (VR)
Outline
In virtual reality (VR) applications, the quality of experience (QoE) perceived by the user is likely to be determined by interaction between audio and visual cues presented simultaneously rather than just the audio or visual alone. Although Audio-Visual Interaction (AVI) has been researched in many contexts, (e.g., speech recognition, visual realism, environmental noise perception, etc.), to date there has been no exclusive study conducted on the influence of AVI on the subjective audio and video qualities in relation to various objective quality degradation parameters. From this background, this PhD project will aim to provide answers to the following research questions. 1. If and how the perception of audio (video) quality is influenced by the presence of video (audio), and how much the video (audio) quality matters for this? 2. What are the perceptually relevant audio quality degradation parameters in various AVI scenarios? 3. What is the optimal perceptual weighting between the audio and video qualities in terms of maintaining high QoE in multimedia and VR applications? Theoretical findings from this project will have important implications for efficient and effective audio-visual processing. The applicant will need good knowledge in psychoacoustics and be proficient in MATLAB and C++ programming languages.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Linear power amplifiers for UHDTV DVB-T2 broadcasting and broadcasting antenna optimisation.
Outline
Linear Power Amplifiers are used in a wide variety of applications including: Wireless Communications, TV broadcasting, Radar, Wireless LAN, etc. The Laterally Diffused Metal Oxide Semiconductor (LDMOS) amplifier shows a much more linear behaviour than a classic Bipolar or a MOSFET amplifier. Consequently, a Digital Video Broadcasting – Second Generation Terrestrial (DVB-T2) transmitter will exhibit an improved performance in terms of output power and efficiency if built using LDMOS technology. LDMOS amplifiers for TV transmitters present very low distortion when compared with MOSFETs and BJTs at UHF frequencies. Furthermore, LDMOS has a very high gain. A key part of the proposed research will be focused on the development of highly efficient, high-power and low-distortion linear power amplifiers. Simulation tools will include ADS and Matlab. Measurements will be performed with Vector Network Analysers and Spectrum Analysers of the RF Radio Lab. Another aspect of the research will be focused on the design of broadcasting antennas using evolutionary optimisation algorithms. Evolutionary optimisation methods, which have superseded older genetic algorithms, have been used with success in many scientific fields, including computational electromagnetics. The proposal is that these are improved and applied to the optimisation of broadcasting and wideband antennas.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Measurement and Analysis of Multi-Dimensional Surface Acoustics
Outline
This research will incorporate a literature review to assess the current state of the art in surface technology. The ability to map sound pressure levels across 2D and 3D surfaces allows the user to assess any anomalies within a space resulting from poor architectural design and/or unwanted sound sources. The project will also aim to incorporate the design of a working prototype that will offer a faster and more accurate method of surface measurement through the use of a distributed parallel measurement system.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Mechanical design of permanent magnet rotors for very high speed electric motors.
Outline
This project will explore the range of feasible designs for high speed electric motor rotors constructed using rare earth magnets. Whilst concentrating on the mechanical aspects of the rotor design, the project will not neglect the requirement for good electromagnetic performance. The project will include: •Investigation of the electromagnetic and manufacturing constraints placed on rotor design. •Exploration of concepts to prevent rotor bursting due to excessive tensile stress in the permanent magnet. •Development of theoretical models of the stress distribution through rotors constructed from interfering and/or wire wrapped cylinders. •Use of finite element models of rotor assemblies to investigate mechanical strength and electromagnetic performance. These models will provide confidence in the closed form theoretical models and help to identify the limitations of those models. •Experimental work using both static and the high speed spin tester to provide validation data for the theoretical and numerical models. •Development and demonstration of a methodology to identify the range of feasible designs within the design space taking account of material property constraints as well as electromagnetic and manufacturing constraints.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Meta-MIMO
Outline
Mobile based technologies are considered the biggest technology platform in history, and the next phase of the wireless revolution, 5G based technologies, is predicted to be transformative across society (healthcare, communication, VR, media, education, etc). MIMO (Multiple Input, Multiple Output) is an antenna based technology that multiplies the data capacity of wireless technologies by using multiple transmitting and receiving antennas. For optimal operation the multiple antenna elements in MIMO at 60GHz should be spaced approximately 60GHz apart. This proximity causes interference between antenna elements, a parasitic behaviour, that prevents the technology from working correctly. In this project we aim to engineer metamaterials for 5G MIMO applications. Metamaterials are artificial sub- wavelength composite materials, that derive their properties not from their material composition but from their geometry. The project will initially focus on simulations to design novel meta-atom materials to suppress parasitic effects that inhibit MIMO technologies. We will achieve this by first numerically studying the performance of a MIMO antenna. This numerical analysis will enable us to understand the nature of the mutual coupling between antenna elements. Having identified the nature of the mutual coupling we will design/study metamaterials to suppress and control the mutual coupling.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Model-based Condition Monitoring of High Integrity Plant
Outline
By definition the condition monitoring of high integrity plant needs to be refined and capable permitting incipient deterioration to be detected and located both robustly and reliably at a very early stage of deterioration. This problem is compounded by the fact that many types of high integrity plant (e.g. electro-hydraulic servo systems) are difficult to monitor in ways which permit fault diagnosis. This project aims to investigate the use of model-predictive methods in condition monitoring using the latest in model-based approaches and validating their performance by applying them to a complex electro-hydraulic test rig specifically designed and built for this research work.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a First or Upper Second class honours degree or the overseas equivalent in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances a Lower Second class honours degree supplemented by a Masters degree or appropriate relevant work experience may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
Monitoring of Reciprocating Compressors
Outline
The monitoring of sub-assemblies and components in reciprocating plant is notoriously difficult for noise contamination and harsh-environment reasons. It is for these reasons that plant like reciprocating compressors is generally monitored using performance measures. Such approaches however are often insensitive to incipient deterioration. Previous research work within the Group has demonstrated that it is possible to detect and diagnose a range of common compressor valve faults using time-frequency analysis of cylinder head vibration. The purpose of this work is to investigate further the potential offered by advanced analysis of conventionally-monitored compressor vibration and to compare this to the possibilities offered by air-borne acoustic monitoring of the same plant. The project will utilise the single and two-stage reciprocating compressors.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a First or Upper Second class honours degree or the overseas equivalent in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances a Lower Second class honours degree supplemented by a Masters degree or appropriate relevant work experience may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
Non-destructive measurement of complex internal structures
Outline
This project will address the problem of ensuring that the internal structures of hollow components have the specified geometry. This geometry may have been carefully designed to meet a specific engineering purpose and deviations can have a significant impact on product performance. The project will include: Survey current methods of measuring the internal geometry of structures by destructive and non-destructive means. Determine the precision of these techniques limitations in terms of product size wall thickness and material and the relative cost of each technique. Investigate current methods of measuring the external geometry of complex structures including touch probe CMM and laser scanning and identify the barriers preventing the use of these techniques for internal measurement. Assess products with functional internal geometries to determine the range of measurements required the scale and complexity of the geometry and typical access points. Propose concept designs for internal geometry measurement and using a voice of the customer approach select a concept for further development and prototype production. Design and manufacture reference artifacts for internal geometry measurement which can be calibrated using existing external measurement instruments. Calibrate the prototype measurement device using the new reference artifact and assess its performance on example products.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
Operational safety risk ontology for GB railways
Outline
Ontologies play a vital role in the development of enterprise software because they bridge the gap between databases, text analysis, and search engines. Though there is an active research field covering ontologies the application in the safety-domain is not straightforward. Different ontology-building methods have to be assessed and compared for effective and efficient implementation in the railway safety domain and sensible safety indicators have to be developed. Once the effective and efficient knowledge representation is complete, the ontology has to be operationalized in the sense that it can be used to manage safety databases, analyze text based safety documentation in these databases and be used as an investigative tool for risk identification and deviances from normal safety operations.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
Optimisation of charge air temperature control systems for Turbocharged Internal Combustion Engines using novel turbomachinery technologies
Outline
Today the charge air inlet temperature of a turbocharged internal combustion engine is seldom accurately controlled. Whilst air to air and air to water intercoolers are widely used for reducing the charge air temperature the variation of ambient temperature can still have a significant impact on engine efficiency and emissions. This project is to research novel new air induction systems for turbocharged internal combustions engines which are capable of actively controlling the charge air temperature independently of variations in ambient temperature. The work will not only involve the investigation of system components (e.g. turbomachines intercoolers & control devices) but also the total inlet system control strategy to achieve optimal charge air temperature control. The work will lead to the manufacture of a prototype system which will then be evaluated on the test bed and in vehicle.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
PhD Scholarship - Characterisation of Irradiation Damage in Tungsten for Use in Nuclear Fusion Reactors
Outline
The International Experimental Fusion Reactor (ITER, currently under construction in France) aims to be the first nuclear fusion reactor that produces more energy than it consumes. The fusion of deuterium and tritium requires a temperature of around 150,000,000°C. At these temperatures, matter becomes an ionized plasma which in ITER will be contained within a toroidal magnetic field. Nuclear fusion reactions also produce high energy neutrons and alpha particles (helium nuclei) which cause the materials surrounding the plasma to undergo radiation damage. Tungsten is currently the material of choice for use as the plasma facing armour of the divertor section in ITER due to its excellent thermal properties such as its very high melting temperature and thermal conductivity. During its operational lifetime, the material will be exposed to this harsh environment, having to withstand operating temperatures up to 1500°C as well as bombardment from alpha particles and neutrons escaping from the plasma. Radiation damage causes the displacement of atoms from their lattice sites in a material, creating knock-on atoms which then go on to cause further damage, this is known as the damage cascade. These displaced atoms (interstitial atoms) may either recombine with a vacant site and so no damage will endure, or they may combine with another interstitial and grow into a larger defect, with vacancy type defects also able to grow. This produces defect features such as dislocations and cavities which lead to changes in the materials microstructure and crystal lattice. These changes can cause the material to swell, which may lead to structural failure as well as degrading the materials thermophysical and thermomechanical properties, reducing the efficiency of the component. This project will examine the changes to the microstructure and crystal lattice caused by helium ion at different irradiation temperatures by performing in situ and ex situ ion irradiations. The successful candidate will be based at the world-class Microscopes and Ion Accelerators for Materials Investigations (MIAMI) facilities at the University of Huddersfield. Defect populations will be studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and changes in the crystal lattice parameter (to examine swelling of the material) will be studied by medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) and x-ray diffraction techniques. In addition to this, changes in mechanical properties of the ex-situ irradiated material will be characterised using nanoindentation. This work will build up a complete picture of how the nature and type of defects (i.e. dislocations and helium bubbles) at the nanoscale lead to changes in materials bulk properties, such as hardening and swelling.
Eligibility
Applicants should hold or expect to obtain a First Class or Upper Second Class (2:1) honours degree or equivalent in physics, chemistry or other relevant discipline.
Funding
This project attracts a three year, tax-free stipend of £14,553 per year (for 2017/18) payable every four weeks and tuition fees will be covered for three years.
Deadline
The closing date for the receipt of completed applications is 30 June 2017 (23.59, BST).
How to apply
PhD Scholarship - Radiation Damage in MAX Phase Nuclear Materials
Outline
This project is dedicated to the study of radiation damage in a class of layered solids known as "MAX phases". MAX phases are characterised by a hybrid metallic-ceramic behaviour and their unique properties depend on stoichiometry defined by the formula Mn+1AXn where M is an early transition metal, A is an A-group element, X is carbon or nitrogen and n = 1, 2 or 3. MAX phases are currently under consideration for a number of nuclear applications both in current generation (Gen-II/Ill light water reactors (LWRs)) and next generation (Gen-IV lead-cooled fast reactors (LFRs) and also fusion) nuclear systems. The world-class Microscopes and Ion Accelerators for Materials Investigations (MIAMI) facilities at the University of Huddersfield allow the in situ observation of the evolution of radiation damage within a material. Radiation damage is a dynamic process and by observing the effects in real-time at the length scales accessible via transmission electron microscopy, it is possible to get new and important insights into the mechanisms determining the performance of materials under irradiation thus aiding advanced material development for the nuclear industry. Nuclear materials are exposed to neutron irradiation whilst in-service. Neutron irradiation causes atoms to be displaced from their equilibrium positions in the crystal lattice. This can introduce defects (voids, dislocations), cause phase transformations (amorphisation, decomposition, radiation-induced segregation at grain boundaries) and adversely affect material performance (embrittlement, swelling, creep). Select compositions of MAX phases and carefully­ tailored microstructures are under consideration as advanced nuclear materials due to their inherent resistance to this type of damage. In collaboration with researchers at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK•CEN) and KU Leuven (both in Belgium) who design and fabricate 'nuclear grade' MAX phase ceramics suitable for diverse applications, this PhD project will combine ion irradiation with in situ transmission electron microscopy to assess the response of these materials to radiation damage. Radiation damage in MAX phases is becoming a hot topic for the nuclear industry [1-6] as these materials are candidates for a number of potential applications (for example, accident-tolerant fuel cladding materials in Gen-11/111 LWRs, structural and fuel cladding materials in Gen-IV LFRs). The combination of the world-class MIAMI ion irradiation facilities with the unique MAX phase ceramics designed and produced by our collaborators at SCK•CEN and KU Leuven has a high probability of addressing important technological issues for the nuclear industry and generating high-impact scientific publications. Directly observing the dynamic evolution of the MAX phase microstructure whilst under ion irradiation will develop a better insight into the fundamental processes governing the response of these materials to radiation and explore their potential for specific nuclear applications. Moreover, the systematic use of ion irradiation to recreate defect microstructures similar to the ones observed in neutron-irradiated MAX phases [3-6) will help to accelerate materials development in the highly-conservative nuclear sector and to reduce the high costs typically associated with nuclear material qualification. This project will feed directly into on-going research activities both at Huddersfield and in Belgium, will provide important insights into the behaviour of innovative nuclear materials under irradiation and thus support nuclear research and development in the UK and internationally. Furthermore, the student involved in this project will be trained in the fields of atomic collisions in solids, nuclear materials, and in situ transmission electron microscopy techniques, making them highly employable in both academia and industry.
Eligibility
Applicants should hold or expect to obtain a First Class or Upper Second Class (2:1) honours degree or equivalent in physics, chemistry or other relevant discipline.
Funding
This project attracts a three year, tax-free stipend of £14,553 per year (for 2017/18) payable every four weeks and tuition fees will be covered for three years.
Deadline
The closing date for the receipt of completed applications is 30 June 2017 (23.59, BST).
How to apply
PhD Scholarship - Radiation Damage in Nanostructures
Outline
Radiation damage in nanostructures is an area of intense scientific research with applications in many areas. For example: the response of semiconductor nanowires to irradiation used to engineer such structures as well as to that experienced when in-service in extreme conditions; the design of radiation-hard nanoporous nuclear materials which derive their resistance from their high surface-to-volume ratios; and the understanding of radiation effects in nanoparticles exposed to extra-terrestrial environments to explore the evolution of the cosmos. The processes behind radiation damage in materials are both complex and dynamic. Therefore, to gain fundamental insights into these phenomena and the mechanisms which drive them, it is invaluable to be able to observe the changes in real-time at the nanoscale at which they occur. The Electron Microscopy and Materials Analysis (EMMA) Research Group at the University of Huddersfield specialises in the investigation of radiation damage in materials using transmission electron microscopy with in situ ion irradiation which allows exactly this type of experiment to be performed. The successful applicant will have the opportunity to use the Microscopes and Ion Accelerators for Materials Investigations (MIAMI-1 and MIAMI-2) facilities at the University of Huddersfield which combine transmission electron microscopes with ion beam systems to allow in situ studies of radiation damage effects at the nanoscale. MIAMI-1 has a track record of research in nanostructures including graphene, gold nanorods, nanodiamonds and semiconductor nanowires. The new MIAMI-2 has recently been completed with £3.5M funding from the United Kingdom’s Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and is a state-of-the-art facility with world-leading experimental capabilities. The PhD candidate appointed to this fully-funded studentship will have the opportunity to work alongside colleagues on existing projects on nanostructures to develop their skills and knowledge before choosing the specific area in which they are most interested in pursuing for their own research.
Eligibility
Applicants should hold or expect to obtain a First Class or Upper Second Class (2:1) honours degree or equivalent in physics, chemistry or other relevant discipline.
Funding
This project attracts a three year, tax-free stipend of £14,553 per year (for 2017/18) payable every four weeks and tuition fees will be covered for three years.
Deadline
The closing date for the receipt of completed applications is 30 June 2017 (23.59, BST).
How to apply
PhD Scholarship - Radiation Damage in Nuclear Materials
Outline
The next generation of nuclear fission reactors and new fusion technologies will require novel materials capable of withstanding significant levels of radiation damage at high temperatures and in a range of environments. This project is aimed at understanding how some of the materials proposed for these applications will respond to these extreme conditions. Using transmission electron microscopy, with in situ ion irradiation, we are able to subject a nuclear material to an operational-lifetime of radiation damage in a single day whilst observing in real-time at the nano to micro scales. This enables us to understand the complex mechanisms of radiation damage helping to predict the outcomes of prolonged exposure of these materials within a nuclear reactor. The Electron Microscopy and Materials Analysis (EMMA) Research Group at the University of Huddersfield specialises in the investigation of radiation damage in materials using transmission electron microscopy with in situ ion irradiation and is one of the few places in the world that this type of experiment can be performed. The successful applicant will have the opportunity to use the Microscopes and Ion Accelerators for Materials Investigations (MIAMI) facilities at the University of Huddersfield which combine transmission electron microscopes with ion beam systems to allow in situ studies of radiation damage effects at the nanoscale. This includes use of the new state-of-the-art MIAMI-2 system that has recently been completed with £3.5M funding from the United Kingdom’s Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). The PhD candidate appointed to this fully-funded studentship will work alongside colleagues on existing projects to develop their skills and knowledge before choosing the specific area in which they are most interested in pursuing for their own research. As part of the PhD, the successful candidate will also have the opportunity to travel internationally to conferences and workshops, to meet with other researchers from both academia and industry, and to present their work to the wider nuclear community.
Eligibility
Applicants should hold or expect to obtain a First Class or Upper Second Class (2:1) honours degree or equivalent in physics, chemistry or other relevant discipline.
Funding
This project attracts a three year, tax-free stipend of £14,553 per year (for 2017/18) payable every four weeks and tuition fees will be covered for three years.
Deadline
The closing date for the receipt of completed applications is 30 June 2017 (23.59, BST).
How to apply
PhD Scholarship - Radiation-tolerant Materials for Future Energy Systems
Outline
This fully-funded PhD studentship (fees paid plus stipend of £14,553 for three years) is supported by the Horizon 2020 consortium “IL TROVATORE” (Innovative Cladding Materials for Advanced Accident-Tolerant Energy Systems). The IL TROVATORE project brings together more than thirty research and commercial organisations from around the globe. It aims to irradiate and characterise radiation damage in advanced cladding materials such as silicon carbide, nano-laminated ternary carbides, oxides and advanced metal alloys. By combining complementary in situ and ex situ experimental techniques, a much greater understanding of the radiation damage mechanisms in these next-generation nuclear materials will be established. As part of this effort, state-of-the-art in situ ion irradiation facilities (MIAMI-1 and MIAMI-2) at the University of Huddersfield will be employed. Samples of novel cladding materials for nuclear fuel rods, developed and produced by consortium members, will be prepared using Focused Ion Beam (FIB) milling and investigated using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) whilst under ion irradiation. Using this approach, the complex nature of radiation damage in these materials will be accessed, fundamental processes will be identified and explored. On the basis of the outcomes from the project, the most radiation-tolerant materials will be recommended for commercial exploitation.
Eligibility
This scholarship is open to all UK and EU citizens, resident in the UK for at least 3 years. Applicants should hold or expect to obtain an honours degree or equivalent in materials science, physics, chemistry or other relevant discipline.
Funding
This scholarship attracts a three year, tax-free stipend of £14,553 per year (for 2017/18) payable every four weeks and tuition fees will be covered at Home/EU rates for three years.
Deadline
The closing date for the receipt of completed applications is 30 June 2017 (23.59, BST).
How to apply
Rethinking the audio mixing interface for the 21st Century
Outline
Do modern audio mixing tools provide the user with the necessary information in an intuitive format to quickly and easily produce better mixes? Do the physical interfaces enable the user to interact with the provided mix information effectively? Should the interface remain reliant on the traditional channel-strip paradigm or is there a better alternative? This project aims to reconsider traditional mixing interfaces to develop more effective yet simpler interfaces, that provide better visual feedback and interaction. The premise is that the mixing interface should be freed from the constraints of real and visual representations of physical hardware components, such as faders and knobs/encoders, to construct new and intuitive metaphorical interfaces. In comparison to the plethora of innovative interfaces for musical expression, core audio production tool interfaces have remained largely unchanged since the 1970’s. Furthermore, these interfaces have received relatively scant attention with regard to usability evaluation, leading researchers to question whether these established paradigms really meet the needs of the user. Multi-track audio consists of many audio samples with similarities to big data problems. By adopting a user-centred design approach this data can be condensed and visualised to create intuitive/assistive interfaces that can be evaluated in terms of their usability.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
Separation Using Rotating Packed Bed Technology
Outline
Conventional separators (for CO2 and etc) are extremely large facilities measuring upto 30m tall and over 1m in diameter. This occupies significant physical space which is becoming more and more costly. The initial cost of building such facilities is enormous and maintenance costs of such physical facilities is also significant. This project aims to investigate replacing this conventional separator with miniature separator using rotating packed bed (RPB) technology. In theory, this unit can be of desktop size with capabilities similar to that of the conventional separators. This project will develop numerical methods for the separation of CO2 and will investigate different approaches to increase the residence time of the fluid to be processed within the RPB to increase the separation during the process. This technology can be used to separate CO2 from various sources, such as power plants, industrial furnaces and natural gas production. The separated CO2 can then be sequestrated underground.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Signal Processing Algorithms for millimetre Wave (mm-Wave) communications
Outline
This project will address the following hardware constraints of 5G mm-Wave system: 1. The mm-Wave band allows us to pack more antennas in the same place which reduces the antenna aperture, resulting in less power captured by the receiver. 2. The wider bandwidth makes the multipath profile sparse, resulting in a large number of resolvable multipath at the receiver. The complexity of the receiver will be extreme if all these multipaths are resolved. 3. This wider bandwidth requires an analogue to digital converters (ADC) of higher resolution resulting in a large amount of energy dissipated. The project will tackle the above issues by designing new signal processing algorithms: 1. Proposed signal to noise ratio (SNR) algorithms and the 30 channel will allow rejecting the nearby interferers by the help of angle of arrival (AoA) and angle of departure (AoD) improving the power captured by the receiver. 2. New techniques will be proposed where multipaths with higher energy are selected and resolved, resulting in reduced complexity and similar performance. 3. ADCs will be designed that will not operate at the Nyquist rate resulting in less power dissipated.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Simulating burst wheel containment in turbochargers.
Outline
The aim of this project is to provide a robust methodology for simulating the interaction between failed wheels in turbochargers and the housings designed to contain them. The project will require the use of advanced numerical simulation techniques and the acquisition of validation data by experimental means. The project will include: •Investigation of the mechanical properties of wheel and housing materials over the range of typical operating temperatures. •Development of a data bank of burst wheel configurations (i.e. size and shape of fragments) together with wheel speed and materials. This will be based on historical data held at Huddersfield. •Expansion of the wheel failure data bank based on continued wheel testing. •Development of experimental techniques to record the burst event and capture wheel fragments following burst to prevent secondary damage. •Development of finite element models to simulate impact of the wheel fragments with the turbocharger housing. These models will allow for fragments of a range of sizes and shapes, a range of wheel speeds and variable relative position of fragments and housing features at the moment of burst. •Use of the finite element models combined with stochastic analysis to determine the probability of worst case scenarios occurring.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Simulation based inverse design of functional surfaces incorporating artificial roughness exposed to fluid flow
Outline
The aim of the research work is to develop an inverse design methodology to develop a unique surface profile for a required functional performance (flow behaviour) and hence it will involve development of an algorithm to generate surface profiles from geometrical parameters characterising the surface as well as develop molecular flow model for flow near the wall surface having artificially created roughness and establish quantitative dependence of surface parameters with flow features very close to the wall. Furthermore development of computational fluid dynamic simulations (continuum based) for flow over wall surface and establish quantitative dependence of surface roughness parameters with flow features away from the wall will be an essential part of this project.
Eligibility
The normal level of attainment required for entry is: A Master's degree or an honours degree (2:1 or above) or equivalent, in a discipline appropriate to the proposed programme to be followed, or appropriate research or professional experience at postgraduate level, which has resulted in published work, written reports or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Steps towards autonomous manufacturing of ultra-precision surfaces, through artificial intelligence
Outline
A revolution is facing industry worldwide, through what Germany calls 'Industry 4.0' - smart factory, autonomous manufacturing and bespoke mass-production. The Parliamentary and Scientific Committee in January 2017 debated 'Disruptive Technologies', focussing on artificial intelligence (AI) and autonomous manufacturing, recognised as essential for UK competitiveness. A particular point was the need for more AI specialists to meet this demand, leading to excellent career prospects in this and supporting technologies. PhD projects focus on achieving major reductions in cost and time for ultra-precision surfaces, required widely by industry, healthcare, science and other sectors, and potentially enabling mass-production of customised parts at no more cost/time than many identical units. The range of projects involves:- • Applying Al methods to automate decision-making throughout the manufacturing-cycle • Improving fidelity of in-process data-logging, and surface-measurement between manufacturing process-steps, on which Al decision-making depends • Improving fidelity of the processes themselves that execute Al decisions • Robotics to automate process-flow The projects are multi-disciplinary, range from purely computational, to strongly lab-based. They involve AI techniques, computation and data analysis, engineering design, process-development and measurement methods. MATLAB or C++ would be particularly useful. Students will be well-motivated, numerate, good communicators, and willing to share time between Huddersfield and the OpTIC Centre, N Wales.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Surface finish optimisation in 3D printing additive manufacturing.
Outline
The aim of the project is to significantly improve surface finish of 3D printed parts and eliminate need for additional post-processing. 3D printing have already revolutionised prototyping and custom manufacturing. Next step in technology development is to improve surface quality and make it comparable with subtracting manufacturing and moulding. This project will focus on numerical modelling of inkjet printing on a powder bed and will use Lattice Boltzmann method for predictive wettability of porous powder bed. This method has proven to be highly successful in static and dynamic wetting and provide unique feature of high fidelity contact angle hysteresis modelling. This project will be collaboration between the University of Huddersfield working on numerical modelling and University of Oxford working in this area on experimental optimisation of 3D printing processes. Main objective will be to develop numerical model and using multi-objective optimisation method analyse and improve surface finish of 3D printed parts.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable. The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
The Development of a Micro Sensor System
Outline
Measurement of operating parameters is critical in various engineering applications such as control and condition monitoring of machinery. However many machinery conditions have to be estimated from indirect measurement due to the limits of sensor and measurement systems. For example the vibration of a pump impeller is often estimated by the vibration of bearing housing because it is very difficult to conduct a direct measurement. One of the limits to these applications is that the sensing and measurement system is too large and heavy to apply directly on the components. This PhD research attempts to design a novel micro sensor system which will be small and light enough to allow direct installation on the components to be monitored. This technology has significant implications to the condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of machines by allowing critical parameters to be measured directly during operation. The research area includes design of micro electromechanical system (MEMS) for sensing signal amplification and communication. A successful candidate will have an academic background in engineering science or maths preferably with experience in mechanical or electronic areas. Analytical and programming skills are desirable.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a First or Upper Second class honours degree or the overseas equivalent in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances a Lower Second class honours degree supplemented by a Masters degree or appropriate relevant work experience may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
The Distributed Monitoring of Plant
Outline
Digital networks incorporating structured hierarchical message protocols are becoming the norm in factory automation and control. Preliminary research work performed within the Group and funded by the European Union has shown that it is possible to combine plant control condition monitoring and maintenance decision making within the same network by utilising surplus bandwidth to convey maintenance information via low-status messages. When used in conjunction with sensors which incorporate local processing and decision-making algorithms (so-called 'intelligent sensors') a truly integrated plant control and monitoring system becomes a reality. This project will use industry-standard equipment to construct a distributed monitoring system incorporating intelligent devices and will explore the potential that this offers.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a First or Upper Second class honours degree or the overseas equivalent in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances a Lower Second class honours degree supplemented by a Masters degree or appropriate relevant work experience may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
The Monitoring of Plant Based Upon Power Supply Parameters
Outline
The vast majority of industrial plant is powered by an electric prime mover. Preliminary research work within the Group has implied that it may well be possible to monitor the condition of a machine indirectly by analysing its power supply parameters (such as consumed current and line voltage) using advanced signal processing techniques such as time-frequency methods and wavelets. This project will investigate the potential of power supply monitoring of motors and gearboxes using model-predicted and empirical means. A state-of-the-art 3-phase break-out box has been designed and built permitting the power supply to a test rig to be analysed in high resolution.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a First or Upper Second class honours degree or the overseas equivalent in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances a Lower Second class honours degree supplemented by a Masters degree or appropriate relevant work experience may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
The Time-Frequency Analysis of Acoustic Emissions
Outline
The vast majority of vibration monitoring is performed in the frequency range 0-20kHz and for many common machine faults this is well understood and capable. Nevertheless there exists an alternative form of vibration monitoring which focuses upon high frequency surface waves called stress waves or acoustic emissions (AE). AE has been shown to offer certain advantages over conventional vibration monitoring in some specific fault cases (e.g. lack of lubrication in rolling-element bearings). However AE results are generally quoted as a single number (equivalent to an overall vibration level) and it is possible that this reduction in dimensionality may be masking important information within the AE data. The purpose of this project is to investigate the potential offered by applying state-of-the-art signal processing techniques (such as time-frequency and wavelet analysis) which are generally used only in conventional vibration monitoring to AE signals. Use will be made of several industry-standard test facilities within the laboratory.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a First or Upper Second class honours degree or the overseas equivalent in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances a Lower Second class honours degree supplemented by a Masters degree or appropriate relevant work experience may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
Towards metrology systems on-a-chip using monolithic photonic integration
Outline
Metrology systems cost is a major challenge inhibiting the uptake of embedded metrology more widely across many areas of manufacturing, particularly in those areas requiring high/ultra-precision. Traditional optical measurement, based on techniques such as interferometry, is often carried out by costly and sizeable instrumentation. Even where efforts have been made to miniaturise measurement technology, the underlying technology is bulk optics, which has a large component and assembly costs. This project will investigate the creation of optical metrology systems on-a-chip, where monolithic photonic integration will be used to develop light sources, detectors and other sub-components necessary to development truly low-cost miniaturised sensors for the measurement of surface topography, layer thickness and displacement. Optical design including modelling of components both in-air and in-waveguide will be required to develop front-end probing for the sensor. Gaining and applying a working knowledge of optical metrology techniques will be necessary to feed into the design and development of the monothically integrated photonic sub-components. Electrical and optical performance validation of developed photonic sub-components will also be an important activity. This will lead ultimately to complete systems integration, validation and a prototype device which will require the development of signal processing and calibration techniques prior to demonstration.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Towards Terabit per Second Indoor Wireless Communications
Outline
Ultra-wideband (UWB) multiple-antenna (MA) and dual-polarization frequency-reuse (DPFR) systems have the potential to increase wireless channel capacity. UWB technology can yield high capacities over short ranges. Given a sufficiently rich scattering environment MIMO technology can yield a capacity advantage up to a factor equal to the lesser of the number of antennas at transmitter and receiver. DPFR can yield a capacity advantage up to a factor of two. Dual-polarized MIMO has also been shown to be feasible. Optimistic (but not implausible) calculations based on optimum spectral shaping of 3.1 - 10.7 GHz UWB signals 0 dBi MIMO antenna elements with noise temperatures of 300 K free-space path-loss (averaged over spatial fading) uncorrelated fields at 24 dual-polarized antennas with wavelength spacing (at 3.1 GHz) occupying an area at transmitter and receiver of 0.15 m2).
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

How to apply
Track System Dynamics.
Outline
This project relates to the prediction of railway track dynamics behaviour under train operation in view of predicting maintenance and design requirements. It requires the development of existing and new numerical modelling techniques, based on multibody system and finite element methods, to better predict track systems behaviour under its various forms (either ballasted or non-ballasted). A wide range of frequency needs to considered depending on associated damage mechanisms and in order to carry out design optimisation of the systems components. Key aspects of the work will be to develop improved understanding of the way in which the forces exerted by the train are supported and distributed through the rail, sleepers, ballast and substructure. The interdependent role of the subgrade in the performance of track and design characteristics is essential. Likewise improved rail materials have made a big impact on the performance of the rail but there is more to be done and this needs to be matched by improvements in other parts of the system. Discontinuities which exist at switches and crossings or rail joints as well as transitions zones are also key factors which need to be included in any analysis or model.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Transceiver design for Non-orthogonal Multiple Access (NOMA) in 5G Communication Networks
Outline
The unprecedented growth of wireless traffic in recent years has led to the quest of next generation 5G mobile communication networks. The main targets of 5G network are 10-100x data rate, 1OOOx capacity per unit area, 10-100x connected devices, roundtrip latency(« 1ms), 10x energy efficiency, and support for Internet of Things (loT) applications. Motivated by the spectral inefficiency of orthogonal multiple access techniques in current mobile networks, non­ orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) has been recognised as a promising technique to significantly improve spectral efficiency of future wireless networks and is envisioned to be a key component of the 5G networks. Power domain NOMA has been highlighted as a key technology to provide NOMA in 5G networks. In power domain NOMA, different users are allocated different power levels according to their channel conditions to obtain the maximum gain in system performance. Such power allocation is also beneficial to separate different users, where successive interference cancellation is often used to cancel multi-user interference. This project will develop highly-efficient, low-complexity, single-/multi-user power domain NOMA transceiver solutions for 5G networks. The project will also focus on the applications of NOMA in loT where it is expected to provide useful results to achieve superior communication.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding
Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.
Deadline
Standard University deadlines apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Virtual Tendon - computational framework development for disease prevention and improving the treatment of soft tissues.
Outline
Tendons are tough, flexible pieces of connective tissue that connect muscles to the skeleton allowing them to efficiently convert muscular force into movement. Any loss of function of tendons leads to pain and loss of mobility and repair is extremely expensive both for the patient and the NHS. The aim of this PhD project is to develop a well validated, multi-scale computational representation of tendon, which can be used as a tool to understand tendon physiology and pathophysiology, a framework for encapsulating existing and future experimental data knowledge, and a catalyst for directing future laboratory-based investigation. Once the model is up and running, any combination of parameters can be altered to represent different patient types and tissue damage, and the outcomes assessed. Eventually, the project aims to use the virtual tendon to inform therapy options and assess outcomes. A candidate with engineering background and interest in applying engineering knowledge in medical and biological application is encouraged to apply for this position. This is a unique opportunity to work with individuals and groups from other disciplines and also develop skills in novel engineering areas such image analysis and computational biomechanics .
Eligibility
The normal level of attainment required for entry is: A Master's degree or an honours degree (2:1 or above) or equivalent, in a discipline appropriate to the proposed programme to be followed, or appropriate research or professional experience at postgraduate level, which has resulted in published work, written reports or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply
Wheel-rail interaction and contact modelling.
Outline
The wheel-rail interface is a mechanically highly stressed aspect of a railway system and as a result represents a safety critical interface between the vehicle and track. The performance of this interface also has an impact on the costs and efficiency of the operation of the railways. Scientific developments are therefore required to improve the theoretical understanding, computer modelling and management of various aspects of wheel-rail contact. These areas include: • Improved measurement and modelling of wheel-rail contact conditions • Improved understanding and modelling of wheel-rail damage mechanisms (e.g. rolling contact fatigue, wear, plastic flow, squats, corrugation) • Improved modelling of friction in the wheel-rail contact • Modelling the material behavior within the wheel-rail contact • Influence of adhesion, traction/braking and lubrication on wheel-rail damage The application of emerging techniques and technologies in lubrication, metallurgy and condition monitoring is also of great interest to understand how these techniques can improve the understanding and performance of the wheel-rail interface.
Eligibility
The standard entry requirement for PhD study is a first or upper second-class honours degree, or the overseas equivalent, in a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, a lower second-class honours degree supplemented by a master’s degree, or appropriate relevant work experience, may be acceptable.
Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline
Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/
How to apply

We offer supervision to PhD level in a wide range of areas where we are carrying out state of the art research.

The School of Computing and Engineering has three institutes and a number of research centres and groups that cover a diverse range of topics within Mechanical and Electronic Engineering:

•  Institute of Railway Research

•  Turbocharger Research Institute

•  Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Advanced Metrology

•  Institute for Accelerator Applications

•  Centre for Efficiency and Performance Engineering

•  Centre for Precision Technologies

•  Adaptive Music Technologies Research Group

•  Energy, Emissions and the Environment Group

•  Condition Monitoring and Diagnosis Group

•  Measurement and Data Analysis Group

•  Electron Microscopy and Materials Analysis Group

•  Automotive and Marine Engineering Research Group

•  Music Technology and Production Research Group

•  Systems Engineering Research Group

You are advised to take time to investigate the University's website to find out more details about the research we conduct. Please visit the Research section of the website to take a look at the information there.

To find out about the staff in this subject area please visit the subject area page, or alternatively, to look at profiles of any of our academic staff, you can visit our academic staff profile page.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes to aspects of a course or how it is delivered. We only make these changes if they are for reasons outside of our control, or where they are for our students’ benefit. We will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible. Our regulations set out our procedure which we will follow when we need to make any such changes.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Higher Education Funding Council for England is the principal regulator for the University.

How much will it cost me?

In 2017/18, the full-time tuition fee for UK and EU postgraduate research students at the University of Huddersfield is £4,165 (see Fees and Finance for exceptions).

Tuition fees will cover the cost of your study at the University as well as charges for registration, tuition, supervision and examinations. For more information about funding, fees and finance for UK/EU students, including what your tuition fee covers, please see Fees and Finance. Please note that tuition fees for subsequent years of study may rise in line with inflation (RPI-X).

If you are interested in studying with us on a part-time basis, please visit our Fees and Finance pages for part-time fee information.

If you are an international student coming to study at the University of Huddersfield, please visit the International Fees and Finance pages for full details of tuition fees and support available.

Please email the Student Finance Office or call 01484 472210 for more information about fees and finance.

Scholarships

Please visit our webpages to check if you are eligible for the Vice Chancellor’s Scholarship for University of Huddersfield graduates.

The University offers a limited number of full and partial fee waivers. If you wish to be considered for a scholarship, please read through the scholarship guidance and include the name of the scholarship on your online application.

Additional Programme costs

Additional programme costs (sometimes known as bench fees) may be charged for research degrees in which there are exceptional costs directly related to the research project. For some subject areas, such as Science and Engineering, these costs could range from £3,000 - £16,000 per year, dependent upon the research project. If you wish to know if these costs will apply to the course you’re interested in, please email the Admissions and Records Office who will direct your query to the relevant department.

Examples of exceptional costs include:

  • Equipment maintenance costs
  • Equipment hire
  • Access costs to specialised equipment
  • Patient/volunteer expenses
  • Tissue/cell culture
  • Special reagents/materials
  • Purchase of laboratory consumables
  • Purchases of additional special permanent laboratory equipment
  • Photography and film processing
  • Video tape filming, recording, CD archiving
  • Specialised computation
  • Travelling costs - where this is integral to the research, it would not normally cover conference attendance except in special circumstances
  • Access to specialist facilities/resources
  • Special statistical packages
  • Access to special databases
  • Data collection costs (eg. postage, envelops and stationary, questionnaire administration)
  • Interview translation and transcription costs.

International

All Postgraduate research students who do not have specific timetabled teaching sessions are required to maintain regular engagement with the University under the Attendance Monitoring Policy.

Information for overseas students with a Tier 4 visa: The University also requires that all overseas students with a Tier 4 visa comply with the requirements set out below:

•  Students are expected to remain in the UK at the address notified to the University until the official end of the academic year.

•  Students are expected to be able to demonstrate, to the University's reasonable satisfaction, that their domestic living arrangements, including their residential location, are conducive to their full engagement with their studies and to their ability to comply with Home Office and University attendance requirements for full time students.

How to apply

To make a formal application, complete the online application form.

This normally includes the submission of a research proposal. Read through the proposal guidelines first to make sure you cover all the information needed, and ensure you include the proposal (if required) when submitting your online application. You can check whether the degree you are applying for requires a proposal by checking the specific course entries.

If you wish to be considered for a scholarship, please read through the scholarship guidance and include the name of the scholarship on your online application.

Applications are assessed based upon academic excellence, other relevant experience and how closely the research proposal aligns with Huddersfield's key research areas.

Research community

The University of Huddersfield has a thriving research community made up of over 1,350 postgraduate research students. We have students studying on a part-time and full-time basis from all over the world with around 43% from overseas and 57% from the UK.

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through undertaking research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills which are current and relevant to your specialist area.

Find out more about our research staff and centres

Research programme

Individuals working towards the award of PhD are required to successfully complete a programme resulting in a significant contribution to knowledge.

You are expected to work to an approved programme of work including appropriate programmes of postgraduate study (which may be drawn from parts of existing postgraduate courses, final year degree programmes, conferences, seminars, masterclasses, guided reading or a combination of study methods).

Research skills training

The University of Huddersfield has an exciting and comprehensive Researcher Skills Development Programme available to all postgraduate researchers. The Researcher Skills Development Programme supports our researchers to broaden their knowledge, allowing them to access tools and skills which can significantly improve employability, whether in academia or industry. It's important to develop transferable personal and professional skills alongside the research skills and techniques necessary for your postgraduate study and research. The programme is also mapped onto Vitae's Researcher Development Framework (RDF), allowing researchers at the University of Huddersfield to benefit from Vitae support as well as our own Programme.

We offer skills training through a programme designed to take advantage of technology platforms as well as face-to-face workshops and courses. The University has subscribed to Epigeum, a programme of on-line research training support designed and managed by staff at Imperial College London which will be accessed via UniLearn, the University's Virtual Learning Environment.

Research supervision

You will be appointed a main supervisor who will normally be part of a supervisory team, comprising up to three members. The research supervisor will advise and support you on your project.


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