Criminology/Criminal Justice (MSc by Research) 2017-18

This course also available for 2018-19 entry

The Research Degree

A Master's by Research (MSc) allows you to undertake a one year (full-time) research degree. It contains little or no formal taught component. This type of study gives you the chance to explore a research topic over a shorter time than a more in-depth doctoral programme.

Research Master's students choose a specific project to work on and have a greater degree of independence in their work than is the case with a taught Master's course.

You'll be expected to work to an approved programme which you will develop in conjunction with your supervisor within the first few months of starting your studies. Whilst undertaking the research project you will also have the opportunity to develop your research skills by taking part in training courses and events.

At the end of the project you write up your findings in the form of a short thesis of around 25,000 words, which will then be examined.

On successful completion, you will be awarded your degree and if you have enjoyed this taste of research you may then decide to apply for the full research doctoral degree (PhD).


Start date:
This research degree has multiple possible start dates including:
18 / 09 / 2017
08 / 01 / 2018
16 / 04 / 2018

Your start date may be decided in agreement with your supervisor.

Duration:

The maximum duration for a full time MSc by Research is 12 months with an optional submission pending (writing up period) of 4 months.

Sometimes it may be possible to mix periods of both full-time and part-time study.

Entry requirements

The normal entry requirements for enrolment on a MSc by Research is an upper second honours degree (2.1) from a UK university or a qualification of an equivalent standard, in a discipline appropriate to that of the proposed programme to be followed.

For applicants whose first language or language of instruction is not English you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification (the minimum of IELTS 6.5 overall with no element lower than 6.0, or equivalent will be considered acceptable).

Further information on international entry requirements and English language entry requirements is available on our international webpages

Contact:

Tel: +44 (0) 1484 473969
Email: researchdegrees@hud.ac.uk

Places available:

This is dependent upon supervisory capacity within the subject area

(this number may be subject to change)

Location:
Huddersfield, HD1 3DH

Apply now Book on an Open Day or Study Fair Order a prospectus Ask a question

What can I research?

Research topics available for this degree:

There are several research topics available for this degree. See below for full details of individual research areas including an outline of the topics, the supervisor, funding information and eligibility criteria.

Research titleSupervisorsApply
Can secure design also be good design? Exploring the relationship between security and aesthetics in housing design
Outline
Progress has been made in incentivising security as a design consideration within housing. Yet questions still arise regarding the impact of security upon aesthetics and design quality – can secure housing be attractive housing? This research seeks to explore the extent to which security and aesthetics can be aligned or whether there are inevitable conflicts between the two.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Circles of Support and Accountability with sex offenders, and other crime prevention strategies.
Outline
CoSA is a particularly socially inclusive way of working with sex offenders in the community to support them to desist from crime and not reoffend. Proposals on how this and similar approaches can be broadened in scope or developed into new ways of protecting the public, especially whilst avoiding marginalisation and social exclusion, would be welcomed.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Computational criminology for crime prevention
Outline
This research topic attempts to use simulation and other computer tools (agent based modelling, serious gaming, for example) to develop new methods for implementing crime prevention interventions. This could be for a range of potential users such as young people and school children, university students, or even professionals working in crime prevention.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Crime analysis
Outline
Proposals to research all areas of crime analysis practice are welcomed. These may include the application and development of theoretical underpinnings, common practice within analysis, the role and relationships of the analyst, analyst training and professional development, analysis in a range of enforcement organisations and investigatory bodies, work on major incidents.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Crime and the decision to move house
Outline
To examine the relationship between perceptions of and experiences of crime and the decision to move house. The study will examine the relationship from the perspective of individual residents/households and at the area level. The research would be informed by the theory and practice of Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) and would explore whether high levels of residential turnover interrupt the operation of informal social control mechanisms such as guardianship and natural surveillance.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Crime and the dynamics of urban structure
Outline
Crime is known to be concentrated and clustered at particular places (Eck and Weisburd, 1984; Weisburd, 2015). This research aims to explore these patterns in more detail, to explore factors behind this, including: local context; police patrols; day to day urban movement and routines; underlying land-use; place management; and changes to everyday spaces - to better understand spatio-temporal patterns of crime concentrations. A range of new and novel data exists that could be used to explore the dynamics of urban settings, such as big data, social media, google street view, aerial photography. The purpose of this study is to explore how the routine movement of everyday life influences patterns of crime.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Crime on public transport: a user perspective
Outline
Public transport users enter a system which constrains their movement. They have little control over who gets on and off carriages they travel on. They may travel through unfamiliar places. At times systems are congested, at others very isolated. . They may travel for work, leisure, as tourists, or for other purposes, alone or in groups. This research explores perceptions of crime and fears of personal security on public transport from the user perspective. Moreover, it attempts to examine whether current crime prevention interventions actually make the users of public transport feel safer, and explores how transport organisations can offer better reassurance to different passenger groups. This is especially important as many users of public transport are young persons, the elderly, those with disabilities, and ethnic minorities – who are often more reliant on public transport and also more fearful of travel.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Designing out anti-social behaviour: What impact can designing out crime have on anti-social behaviour?
Outline
Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) is an approach to crime reduction that aims to reduce crime by influencing the design, build and management of the built, and sometimes natural, environment. Research has shown that this approach can be effective in reducing acquisitive crimes such as burglary and vehicle crime. However, there is little evidence to explore its impact upon anti-social behaviour.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
How effective are burglar alarms – in the words of offenders?
Outline
Research suggests that physical security measures reduce burglary and that offenders are deterred by the threat of surveillance, occupancy and limited escape routes. However, interviews with burglars (Armitage, 2017) throws doubt on the effectiveness of burglar alarms – with burglars stating that they are not deterred by their presence. Through interviews with prolific burglars, this research seeks to explore burglar perceptions of this crime prevention measure.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
How secure is your house? The importance of security for house buyers
Outline
Progress has been made in incentivising and requiring social housing providers to build properties to security standards – specifically in requiring social housing to meet Secured by Design standards. Less progress has been made within the private sector and housing developers have inferred that this reluctance relates to a property being labelled as ‘secure’ deterring potential house buyers (for fear that secure equates to high crime). This research aims to explore the importance of security in house buyers’ decision making.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Immigration and crime
Outline
Crimes committed by, against and within immigrant communities; immigrant concentration and its impact on crime; relationships between immigrant communities and native populations.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Implementing evidence based learning
Outline
Much has been made of the need for a “what works” for reducing crime. Examples include the growing interest in evidence based policing, and the College of Police crime reduction toolkit. This study aims to explore how evidence based knowledge can actually be translated into action by criminal justice agencies. This includes consideration of police training, knowledge transfer, and how best to encourage police teaching and learning. It also questions what constitutes evidence, and what best practice actually means.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Investigative decision making and the historic case
Outline
Although investigative guidance is available for UK police conducting ‘live’ investigations, it is not currently for those deemed cold or historic cases. It is assumed therefore that investigative decision making is generic and that the same cognitive bias exists. Ongoing research suggests that this is not the case and research is required to explore this further.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Nudge psychology and evidence-based policing
Outline
Nudge psychology is becoming an increasingly popular approach to reducing various different crime related problems. Further research is needed to examine how it might be applied to other areas of crime reduction.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Quantitative criminology and victimisation
Outline
Investigations of long term crime and victimisation patterns, changes in incidence concentration and seriousness across large cohorts.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Sex/high risk offenders’ reintegration and desistance
Outline
To examine criminal justice or social processes, policy and practice which support or hinder the desistance and/or reintegration of sex offenders or other high risk offenders within or through prison and into the community. Proposals may focus on specific aspects of criminal justice work or society, including, but not limited to, the work of resettlement prisons, MAPPA, probation approved premises, the transition from prison to the community, employment and education opportunities, housing and accommodation, social stigma and exclusion, individual or social desistance processes.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Sex/high risk offenders’ social networks in the real or virtual environments
Outline
Increasingly we are aware of how important the peer networks of offenders or potential offenders are in forming their criminal (individual and social) identity, and so influencing their criminal career or desistance process. Proposals are welcomed that seek to explore the role and impact of social networks, be they in the virtual or real world domains. Of particular interest are sex offender online networks and ‘sexual ageplay’ groups, though innovative proposals in related areas are also encouraged.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
The ‘Crime Drop’
Outline
Crime has been falling since the 1990s, yet none of the causes suggested so far explain a significant proportion of the drop. Students looking to further expand the research on the topic in quantitative manner are welcome.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
The experience and unintended consequences of imprisonment: prisoners, family and/or friendships
Outline
A growth area in penological research is the study of the unintended impacts of imprisonment on prisoners themselves, as well as on their family and wider social networks. Proposals may focus on the prisoner, in terms of issues relating to the pains of imprisonment or prisoner adaptions and adjustments. For example, the impact of imprisonment on healthy ageing for older prisoners. Alternatively, proposals may focus on the family or social networks, perhaps considering the inter-relations with the prisoner, or the particular impacts on those outside of prison, their support needs and service provision.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
The study of crime in micro-places
Outline
Proposals would seek to explore the spatial and/or temporal concentrations of crime in very small units of analysis, including individual addresses or particular types of premises (eg hospitals, airports). Research findings would add to our knowledge of crime generators, attractors and risky facilities.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Urban designers’ views on crime prevention
Outline
This project would examine what emphasis urban designers place on considering crime prevention in the design of new developments. It would explore how urban designers engage with the police in the design of new developments and what they perceive to be synergises and conflicts between the urban design and crime prevention agendas.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Utility of forensic evidence
Outline
Determining what the utility is of forensic evidence in criminal investigations and in court.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Validity of forensic research
Outline
In the past ten years the scientific basis of forensic science has been challenged, its reliability and validity in court contested and commercialisation of forensic provision introduced in England and Wales. In light of this there is the need for increased research into establishing a sound body of knowledge for forensic science, which supports the requirements of its end-users. This requires an exploration into the applicability and reliability of forensic research.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Wildlife crime
Outline
Green criminology is a growing area of interest, with a particular focus on harms to environments and nonhuman animals. However, research relating to the latter is still relatively limited. Proposals are particularly welcomed for projects seeking to address this by considering the nature, extent and responses to all forms of harms against nonhuman animals from the international to the local (including, for example, illegal trade in endangered species, raptor persecution, (exotic) pet trade, vivisection, (intensive) farming). Proposals are also welcome from researcher-activists and multi-disciplinary projects (eg law, conservation/biological sciences, forensic sciences) may be possible.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply
Workplace violence and workplace safety climate
Outline
Organisational factors may have a key role in the perceptions of safety of workers in risky environments. A workplace’s safety climate can be defined as the degree of commitment to safety demonstrated by the different levels in the organisation including senior-management, supervisors and workers. This study will explore the extent to which management policies and practices around violence prevention influence safety outcomes and the perception of safety in occupations where staff are exposed to the risk of violence.
Eligibility
First or upper second class honours degree from a UK University (or equivalent)
Funding
Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available
Deadline
Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/
How to apply

Applications are welcome for a diverse range of specialist topics and areas of expertise; including reducing burglary, tackling hate crime, exploring the mental health of children of prisoners, preventing violent extremism, violence and the night time economy and the impact of design on levels of crime, among others.

We would especially welcome applications for topics in which the proposed research is in line with the research priorities of the School of Human and Health Sciences. Find out more about the research priorities of the School on this website.

You are advised to take time to investigate the University's website to find out more details about the research we conduct. Please visit the Research section of the website to take a look at the information there.

To find out about the staff in this subject area please visit the subject area page, or alternatively, to look at profiles of any of our academic staff, you can visit our academic staff profile page.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes to aspects of a course or how it is delivered. We only make these changes if they are for reasons outside of our control, or where they are for our students’ benefit. We will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible. Our regulations set out our procedure which we will follow when we need to make any such changes.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Higher Education Funding Council for England is the principal regulator for the University.

How much will it cost me?

In 2017/18, the full-time tuition fee for UK and EU postgraduate research students at the University of Huddersfield is £4,165 (see Fees and Finance for exceptions).

Tuition fees will cover the cost of your study at the University as well as charges for registration, tuition, supervision and examinations. For more information about funding, fees and finance for UK/EU students, including what your tuition fee covers, please see Fees and Finance. Please note that tuition fees for subsequent years of study may rise in line with inflation (RPI-X).

If you are interested in studying with us on a part-time basis, please visit our Fees and Finance pages for part-time fee information.

If you are an international student coming to study at the University of Huddersfield, please visit the International Fees and Finance pages for full details of tuition fees and support available.

Please email the Student Finance Office or call 01484 472210 for more information about fees and finance.

Scholarships

Please visit our webpages to check if you are eligible for the Vice Chancellor’s Scholarship for University of Huddersfield graduates.

The University offers a limited number of full and partial fee waivers. If you wish to be considered for a scholarship, please read through the scholarship guidance and include the name of the scholarship on your online application.

Additional Programme costs

Additional programme costs (sometimes known as bench fees) may be charged for research degrees in which there are exceptional costs directly related to the research project. For some subject areas, such as Science and Engineering, these costs could range from £3,000 - £16,000 per year, dependent upon the research project. If you wish to know if these costs will apply to the course you’re interested in, please email the Admissions and Records Office who will direct your query to the relevant department.

Examples of exceptional costs include:

  • Equipment maintenance costs
  • Equipment hire
  • Access costs to specialised equipment
  • Patient/volunteer expenses
  • Tissue/cell culture
  • Special reagents/materials
  • Purchase of laboratory consumables
  • Purchases of additional special permanent laboratory equipment
  • Photography and film processing
  • Video tape filming, recording, CD archiving
  • Specialised computation
  • Travelling costs - where this is integral to the research, it would not normally cover conference attendance except in special circumstances
  • Access to specialist facilities/resources
  • Special statistical packages
  • Access to special databases
  • Data collection costs (eg. postage, envelops and stationary, questionnaire administration)
  • Interview translation and transcription costs.

International

All Postgraduate research students who do not have specific timetabled teaching sessions are required to maintain regular engagement with the University under the Attendance Monitoring Policy.

Information for overseas students with a Tier 4 visa: The University also requires that all overseas students with a Tier 4 visa comply with the requirements set out below:

•  Students are expected to remain in the UK at the address notified to the University until the official end of the academic year.

•  Students are expected to be able to demonstrate, to the University's reasonable satisfaction, that their domestic living arrangements, including their residential location, are conducive to their full engagement with their studies and to their ability to comply with Home Office and University attendance requirements for full time students.

How to apply

To make a formal application, complete the online application form.

This normally includes the submission of a research proposal. Read through the proposal guidelines first to make sure you cover all the information needed, and ensure you include the proposal (if required) when submitting your online application. You can check whether the degree you are applying for requires a proposal by checking the specific course entries.

If you wish to be considered for a scholarship, please read through the scholarship guidance and include the name of the scholarship on your online application.

Applications are assessed based upon academic excellence, other relevant experience and how closely the research proposal aligns with Huddersfield's key research areas.

Research community

The University of Huddersfield has a thriving research community made up of over 1,350 postgraduate research students. We have students studying on a part-time and full-time basis from all over the world with around 43% from overseas and 57% from the UK.

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through undertaking research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills which are current and relevant to your specialist area.

Find out more about our research staff and centres

Research programme

You are expected to work to an approved programme of work which you will develop within the first few months of commencement of study, in conjunction with your supervisor. Whilst undertaking the research project, under the supervision of the supervisor, will also develop your research skills.

At the end of the project you write up your findings in the form of a short thesis of around 25,000 words and this will then be examined.

On successful completion, you will be awarded your degree and if you have enjoyed this taste of research you may then decide to apply for the full research doctoral degree (PhD).

Research skills training

The University of Huddersfield has an exciting and comprehensive Researcher Skills Development Programme available to all postgraduate researchers. The Researcher Skills Development Programme supports our researchers to broaden their knowledge, allowing them to access tools and skills which can significantly improve employability, whether in academia or industry. It's important to develop transferable personal and professional skills alongside the research skills and techniques necessary for your postgraduate study and research. The programme is also mapped onto Vitae's Researcher Development Framework (RDF), allowing researchers at the University of Huddersfield to benefit from Vitae support as well as our own Programme.

We offer skills training through a programme designed to take advantage of technology platforms as well as face-to-face workshops and courses. The University has subscribed to Epigeum, a programme of on-line research training support designed and managed by staff at Imperial College London which will be accessed via UniLearn, the University's Virtual Learning Environment.

Research supervision

You will be appointed a main supervisor who will normally be part of a supervisory team, comprising up to three members. The research supervisor will advise and support you on your project.


© 2017 University of Huddersfield - All rights reserved

VAT registration number 516 3101 90