University of Huddersfield Logo

Research Students

Please click on the boxes below to find out more about the research students from the School of Art Design and Architecture at the University of Huddersfield:

Adrian Evans – PhD

Adrian Evans
Adrian Evans

Adrian Evans – PhD

PhD Part-time, commenced January 2015
Supervisors: Professor Nicholas Temple and Dr Lisa Stansbie
Research Centre: CUDAS

Research:
Modern architecture is an essay in Zeitgeist – the Spirit of the Time. Largely, it fails to engage with the Genius Loci – the Spirit of the Place.
A modern, but vernacular architecture has emerged in the rural West of Scotland: However, it still denies its Landscape context. Around the dwelling, the land is scraped to a flat plane: gravel; lawn; deck. The palimpsest that was the landscape is reduced to a compositional Background to the Architectural Figure. Its Local Distinctiveness, its narrative, is erased.
There is, in on the remote coast of Assynt, a tiny, extraordinary building, brutally modern, and an element of the landscape quite completely. The Hermit’s Castle, declares in form and name, antithetical archetypes of Scottish architecture in the wilderness: Castle and Bothy.

From this touchstone, My research practice will attempt to find a synthesis of Zeitgeist and Genius Loci in the dialogue between contemporary architecture and land.

Ahmed Ahmed Aly Fahim – PhD

Ahmed Fahim
Ahmed Fahim

Ahmed Ahmed Aly Fahim – PhD

PhD Part-time, commenced September 2016
Supervisors: Professor Angela Lee

Research:
The Impact of the Treble Lean Construction Constraints (i.e. Standardisation, Tools and Techniques, and Culture and Change) in Healthcare Hospitals Projects.
The manufacturing industry has a considerable interest in achieving substantial improvements in terms of productivity and quality.  Researchers are concerned with the applicability of “lean production” principles currently implemented in manufacturing to the Healthcare Hospitals Projects.  The attractive aspect persuading researchers to perform further extensive research is the observation that manufacturing has succeeded in reducing cost and time while improving quality and productivity, whereas the Healthcare Hospitals Projects has not achieved such positive results.  

Ailsa Read – PhD

Ailsa Read
Ailsa Read

Ailsa Read – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced January 2016
Supervisors: Dr Stella Baraklianou and Dr Juliet MacDonald

Research:
This practice-based research is an investigation into the persecution of witches in Seventeenth Century England with a special emphasis on the Lancashire Pendle Witches. This creative practice is developing an interpretation of these women by the use of laser cutting, which accentuates the connection between vulnerability and persecution.

Alessia Grassi – PhD

Alessia Grassi
Alessia Grassi

Alessia Grassi – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced September 2015
Supervisors: Professor Steve Swindells and Stephen Wigley
Research Centre: Fashion Thinking

Research:
This project aims – through a traditional theoretical approach – to investigate how Western European fashion houses are engaging with their public in a seemingly philanthropic way by making their art collections accessible to a wide audience. The research addresses, through an in-depth evaluation of the “Fondation Louis Vuitton” (FLV), specific public engagement strategies and processes used by a fashion house, with particular regard to motivations behind art and culture investments. With a cross-disciplinary approach, this project investigates a new area that combines fashion marketing and public engagement in contemporary art. The opening of the FLV creates an unprecedented intersection between public engagement, fashion and art. This project has the unique opportunity to firstly analyse synergies and innovative approaches, as well as understand the real motivations behind the philanthropic-driven behaviour fashion houses are showing.

Aminu Abdullahi – PhD

Aminu Abdullahi
Aminu Abdullahi

Aminu Abdullahi – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced January 2015
Supervisors: Professor Angela Lee

Research:
The overwhelming scientific evidences and recent events made mankind to consider retracing the path of industrialisation towards more sustainable practices. Biomimicry is an approach that seeks to  provide sustainable technological solutions by asking nature itself, with long list of successes. From the Wright brothers observation of flying birds that led to the aeroplane, to solar cells inspired by leaves, and the concept of industrial ecology whereby human industrial activities are organised in the style of the natural ecological systems in order to produce zero waste. Nevertheless, the wisdom of considering the mother nature as a teacher is a long established tradition among the pre-industrial societies all over the world. They do not only ask nature, they learn to live in harmony and as part of the overall natural sytem. The study of the model of such pre-industrial societies for inspirations to provide sustainable solutions is referred to as the ethnomimicry. This study, is the ethnomimicry of the model of such societies of Kano in Nigeria, where exists a naturally evolved industrial ecology with virtually zero demolition  waste. This research tries to answer the questions of how does this community that produces zero demolition wastes operate? what are the factors that may be influencing the phenomenon?  And why it can or cannot work elsewhere?
With the report that 90% of all materials ever extracted may be residing in the built environment and most of it on the way to the landfill at the end of service of the built facilities, the findings of this research will open another way of turning otherwise waste into wealth while saving the environment.

Annoush Kerianoff – PhD

Annoush Kerianoff
Annoush Kerianoff

Annoush Kerianoff – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced September 2016
Supervisors: Claire Allen and Alison Goodrum

Research:
My study aims to investigate modest dressing communities within London by focusing on Muslim and Jewish women. It will explore how they show their unique identity through the dress they choose to wear, the reasons behind their modest dress and the links to culture and religion that clothing has.
London was chosen as the base for this study due to the high concentration of cultures, ethnicities and religions living within a postmodern city. An anthropological and ethnographic approach will be taken so as to analyse cultural and ‘ethnic’ dress. This thesis will draw on personal contacts and experiences along with academic data and qualitative research collected from all over London.

Anom Rajendra I Gusti Ngurah – PhD

Anom Rajendra I Gusti Ngurah
Anom Rajendra I Gusti Ngurah

Anom Rajendra I Gusti Ngurah – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced October 2012
Supervisors: Professor Nicholas Temple, Dr Richard A. Fellows and Richard Nicholls

Research:
This research focuses on the civic life and civic responsibility of a Balinese community in the context of ceremonial activities and traditions taking place in the littoral regions, tracing relationships between ritual itinerary and topography, and highlighting the tensions and conflicts that have recently emerged between these ritual traditions and recent developments in tourism. The research aims to trace the historical background of this rich ritual tradition of the coastal towns on the island, and to establish its role in Bali today in the light of dramatic economic and social changes. Since there are negative impacts and implications on the civic life of the community, the research aims to formulate a concept of planning and design guidelines which aim to achieve a balance between ecological needs, custody of civic space and sustained development in tourism. 

Barbara Waters – PhD

Barbara Waters
Barbara Waters

Barbara Waters – PhD

PhD Part-time, commenced January 2014
Supervisors: Dr Tracy Cassidy, Stephen Wigley and Professor Steve Swindells
Research Centre: Fashion Thinking

Research:
Brand names are frequently used in popular fiction to help to achieve verisimilitude and support characterisation. My research explores the use of fashion brand names in novels, focussing on the links between symbolic consumption, brand image, brand personality and characterisation, in order to evaluate the use of novels as a resource for fashion brand image research. I will also examine the commercial implications of this phenomenon. Global spending on product placement is increasing as marketers seek alternative ways to connect with consumers in an era of rapidly evolving media consumption patterns. There is evidence that some brand owners are already using novels as a product placement medium but the extent and impact of paid product placement in novels is unclear. My research will evaluate the potential effectiveness of fashion brand placement in popular fiction. The findings should be of interest to fashion brands looking for alternative promotional opportunities.

Bjorn Ross – PhD

Bjorn Ross
Bjorn Ross

Bjorn Ross – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced April 2015
Supervisors: Professor Dilanthi Amaratunga and Professor Richard Haigh
Research Centre: GDRC

Research:
Working Title: "Systematic Approach to Oil Spill Waste Management in Arctic".
 
Exploration drilling in the Arctic Ocean has until date been limited due to extreme weather conditions and high costs.  However, as the ice edge is gradually declining it becomes more practicable and thereby more economic feasible for more oil companies to explore the 30% of the world's undiscovered gas and 13% of the world's undiscovered oil in the area. The 2010 Macondo oil spill in the Mexican Gulf made it evident to the oil industry how wrong a worst case scenario can advance.  In the aftermath of the incident the oil industry have put more emphasis on improving and testing their oil spill contingency plans, but it could be argued that a major oil spill in Arctic might generate a significant larger amount of waste compared to the Macondo spill.  Further, the extreme weather conditions in Arctic would make clean-up operations and logistical support more challenging, thus, it is uncertain to whether the oil industry's current oil spill contingency plans are adequate for managing such an incident.

Carl Strathearn – PhD

Carl Strathearn
Carl Strathearn

Carl Strathearn – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced January 2017
Supervisors: Professor Minhua Ma and Dr Ertu Unver

Research:
Humanoid bio-robotic systems are the electro-mechanical emulation of natural human being, in an attempt to achieve precise simulative likeness. However, the standardised approach of constructing static ocular prosthesis contradict organic human criterion as they are void of the dynamic capacity of the iris.
 
The aim of this practise led project is to develop and construct a set of hyper-realistic artificial humanistic optical sensors that simulate the autonomous fluctuating operations of the human iris in reaction to photo-luminescent stimuli and retain the optical sensory capability and integral formation of the organic eye. With the objective of advancing the external / embodied expressive realism of humanoid bio-robotic systems towards achieving a more accurate simulation.

Caterina Benincasa-Sharman – PhD

Caterina Benincasa-Sharman
Caterina Benincasa-Sharman

Caterina Benincasa-Sharman – PhD

PhD Part-time, commenced October 2007
Supervisors: Professor Paul Ward (Modern British History)
Research Centre: Academy of British and Irish Studies and CUDAS

Research:
The focus of my current research looks at the events and outputs that made up the 1951 Festival of Britain celebrations in Leeds, York, Hull, Manchester and Liverpool. These were key cities in Yorkshire and Lancashire (pre 1974 boundary changes) that were identified by the London based Festival Office to receive significant festival status. These cities used the Festival of Britain to boost civic pride and consolidate their identies of space and place in a post-war world, often restoring, preserving or creating new buildings of architectural significance.

Charles Hippisley-Cox – PhD

Charles Hippisley-Cox
Charles Hippisley-Cox

Charles Hippisley-Cox – PhD

PhD Part-time, commenced October 2014
Supervisors: Professor Adrian Pitts and Dr Martyn Walker
Research Centre: CUDAS

Research:
The PhD will help develop a systematic understanding of the granaries of northern Portugal.  The espigueiro (in Spanish horreo) are a unique building type with antecedents in South America from where maize was introduced to Europe in the 16th century.  This study will identify particular characteristics to help understand both the evolutionary chronology of the physical buildings but also the cultural and economic significance of the granaries.   

Charles Kahabi – PhD

Charles Kahabi
Charles Kahabi

Charles Kahabi – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced April 2015
Supervisors: Dr Karen Shah and Dr Tracy Cassidy

Research:
The PhD research focuses on influencing factors for development of a national dress in Tanzania and the position such factors play in the process. It seeks to establish an understanding and identification of design attributes from indigenous cultural (traditional) wears, means of their incorporation into the national dress and problems associated with the process.


  

Charlotte Cullen – PhD

Charlotte Cullen
Charlotte Cullen

Charlotte Cullen – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced September 2013
Supervisors: Dr Alison Rowley, Dr Rowan Bailey and Dr Jill Townsley
Research Centre: Centre for Sculptural Thinking

Research:
This practice led Phd proposes a queer reading of socially classed and gendered desire as understood through a sculptural practice that positions the object as a site of cruel attachment. The research enquires into the affective object as a material site of assembled positions that can shape our relationship to the body. Lauren Berlant’s theory of ‘Cruel Optimism’, that “something you desire is actually an obstacle to your flourishing” (Berlant, L. 2011) is mobilised to consider the socially classed elements that play a decisive role in the body of sculptural research.

Charlotte Goldthorpe – PhD

Charlotte Goldthorpe
Charlotte Goldthorpe

Charlotte Goldthorpe – PhD

PhD Part-time, commenced January 2015
Supervisors: Professor Steve Swindells, Dr Anna Powell and Dr Natalie McCreesh
Research Centre: Innovative Design Lab

Research:
Can an object be created to store love?

This is a studio-based PhD, producing a series of samples/artefacts/exhibition alongside a theoretical investigative thesis.  The investigative research informs that of the studio-based practice and is led by explorative oral history based case studies.  The design process will be documented and reflected on in a written thesis, which will contextualise the study within my current art practice.

Chathuranganee Jayakody – PhD

Chathuranganee Jayakody
Chathuranganee Jayakody

Chathuranganee Jayakody – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced April 2015
Supervisors: Professor Dilanthi Amaratunga and Professor Richard Haigh
Research Centre: GDRC

Research:
Attentiveness on neighbourhood scale is Inevitable in making cities resilient to natural and human-induced disasters. The inherent features of a neighbourhood such as immediate resources network, social network within close proximity, easy intervention can be considered as strengths of creating neighbourhood resilience.

Most of the contemporary approaches in creating neighbourhood resilience are more focused on forceful community based action projects such as training and education, setting up wide variety of community groups, neighbourhood watch schemes which are virtuous but eventually challenging to implement, especially within urban cities with their busy life style. So in a situation like this, how can we plan and design ‘built-environment’ of a neighbourhood in a way that can rationally create and strengthen the neighbourhood resilience without taking any forceful action. Accordingly this research is focused on incorporating planning and design solutions to strengthen resilient neighbourhoods in urban cities.

Clarissa Notariano Biotto – PhD

Clarissa Biotto
Clarissa Biotto

Clarissa Notariano Biotto – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced October 2015
Supervisors: Professor Patricia Tzortzopoulos
Research Centre:

Research:

Application of BIM technologies in social projects: integration between product and production system design from a lean perspective.

In order to reduce project duration and increase the flexibility of product, the design stage is commonly overlapping the production stage. Decision making in construction projects is fragmented between the stages of design and production, which in general is considered to be problematic and should become better integrated to improve the performance of architectural engineering and construction projects. Using BIM technologies can support the construction professionals to perform analysis at different stages of a project, through the manipulation and evaluation of the impacts of changes in project parameters, provision new information for decision-making. In this context, it’s necessary to study how BIM technology can contribute to integrate the design and production designs, in order to deliver value for final customers of social relevance projects.

Danilo Gomes – PhD

Danilo Gomes
Danilo Gomes

Danilo Gomes – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced April 2015
Supervisors: Professor Patricia Tzortzopoulos Fazenda
Research Centre: Innovative Design Lab

Research:
In order to cope with the paradigmatic change involved in built environment related to managerial and technological developments, it is crucial to investigate how to develop a framework to produce an equivalent thinking change on designers. The research focus is in the role of architecture design in the implementation of Building Information Modelling (BIM) and Lean Construction process, regarding to a substantial change to systemic thinking in the design process. Based on a Design Science research approach it is expected to provide a consistent framework on how to manage this transformation in academic and professional practice.

D W K Hemachandra – PhD

D W K Hemachandra
D W K Hemachandra

D W K Hemachandra – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced January 2016
Supervisors: Professor Dilanthi Amaratunga

Research:

Study of vulnerabilities among females during and after natural disasters; A case of females in flood affected areas in Sri Lanka

Due to specific features of females, they are more vulnerable to natural disasters specially during floods. Even though the general life expectancy is much higher among women than men in almost all countries, studies revealed that the ratio of loss of lives between women is greater than women during floods. This highlights that vulnerabilities among females are different and specific than males. Therefore, this study examines vulnerabilities faced by females during and after a disastrous situation. In terms of disasters, the study will be limited to the areas affected by severe floods during 2013-2014 in Sri Lanka. And also to identify the reasons for such vulnerabilities faced by females in flood affected areas in Sri Lanka. In addition the study aims to identify the factors that hinders the resilience capacity among females in the flood affected areas in Sri Lanka

Elham Del Zendeh – PhD

Elham Del Zendeh
Elham Del Zendeh

Elham Del Zendeh – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced September 2015
Supervisors: Professor Song Wu and Professor Adrian Pitts
Research Centre: IDL

Research:

The influence of indoor design criteria on occupants’ energy consumption behaviour in buildings
 
Several scholars have focused on the influence of occupants’ behaviour on building energy consumption with attention to climatic properties, building types and social behavioural parameters, however, the influence of architecture and interior design of the space on occupants’ energy behaviour have been overlooked. The interior design of the space influences energy behaviour of occupants in different ways: the building openings inside/outside relationships in terms of visual qualities, the circulation and movement of users inside the building which affect their action scenarios, and effects of colours and compositions of the interior spaces, may increase or decrease the occupant’s use of openings or building control systems. This research intends to find the influence of interior design parameters, by changing interior compositions of the selected spaces of the case studies and analysing the consequences of the changes in the final energy consumption.

Farida Virunhaphol – PhD

Farida Virunhaphol
Farida Virunhaphol

Farida Virunhaphol – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced January 2012
Supervisors: Professor Steve Swindells and Dr Juliet MacDonald

Research:
This practice-based research involves in designing three typefaces in Khom Thai, an ancient script in Thailand that was invented approximately in the 13th Century. In familiarity effect, a phenomenon in psychology, it states that a new typeface can be more recognizable if it contains closer structure with previous typefaces that have been exposed to readers. The hypothesis of this research is based on this notion. A new Khom Thai typeface that contains closer elements with modern Thai script will be designed to test against two typefaces, which are designed based on the ancient proportion. Three typefaces will be examined by testing letter recognition accuracy in the short exposure method.

Guo Chen – PhD

Guo Chen
Guo Chen

Guo Chen – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced January 2015
Supervisors: Professor Adrian Pitts and Dr Yun Gao
Research Centre: CUDAS

Research:
Sustainable design at the urbanisation boundary in China

This research project investigates a range of sustainability issues arising from the urbanisation process taking place in almost all areas of China at the present time. It specifically seeks to identify and test the hypothesis that at this boundary there are opportunities to improve sustainable design and reduce negative environmental impacts whilst at the same time satisfying the needs and aspirations of occupants. A secondary hypothesis concerns whether the current procurement processes would permit such development as a means to reduce the performance gap between as-designed and in-use. In this there will be investigation and evaluation of technical and non-technical barriers to achieving optimum outcomes.

James Dyer – PhD

James Dyer
James Dyer

James Dyer – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced January 2015
Supervisors: Dr Spencer Roberts, Professor Alex Coles
Research Centre: G

Research:
Dyer applies a critical form of comparative philosophy to discourses of innovation concerned with the recent emergence of self-tracking fitness and health devices. A certain limit to the purview of critical and popular writings on this nascent topic is identified. Most notably, it is discovered there is an intensive commitment to early modernist forms of substance-metaphysics. Following this finding, Dyer embellishes the fault line between substance and process by conducting a process-philosophical investigation of self-tracking. This is a way to problematize self-tracking, and to bring its radically contingent being and condition of processual becoming, to the foreground of critical examination.

Jo Harris – EntD

Jo Harris
Jo Harris

Jo Harris – EntD

EntD Enterprise Doctorate Part-time, commenced January 2015
Supervisors: Dr David Swann, Professor Liz Towns-Andrews and Dr Kelly Smith

Research:
Investigating the “Real Time” experience of creative enterprise in UK HE design education

This Doctorate of Enterprise (EntD) research will focus on investigating what is the real impact of ‘live’ enterprise experience in design education for undergraduate BA students and Postgraduate MA students. The Surface Design BA(Hons) at Huddersfield is the only university exhibitor at The Surface Design Show, an international trade show for innovative surfaces for architecture, interiors and the built environment sector. The course is recognized as a key educational innovator within the sector. Over the past 10 years it has become more evident that although successful for showing design concepts, product prototyping, attracting student projects, networking and marketing, the real business opportunities generated through the exhibitions are not currently being converted effectively into commercial ideas for business. This enterprise doctorate study aims to draw upon live industry cases to capture and convert the data from curating the ideas to industry. The main contribution to knowledge will be to establish a framework to demonstrate how a SME or internal service can be developed and also converted into entrepreneurial revenue, employability resources and enterprising skill for UG and PG design students and industry. The aim of the research is to develop an operational business plan that will be launched as a business on completion of the Enterprise Doctorate.

Jonathan Lindley – PhD

Jonathan Lindley
Jonathan Lindley

Jonathan Lindley – PhD

PhD Part-time, commenced September 2016
Supervisors: Prof Alex Coles
Research Centre: G

Research:
Generate contemporary subversive culture and contribute to post-subcultural discourse. Utilising design theory and practical translation: can design and communication encourage “The Revolution of Everyday Life”, and in it's realisation, transition an age of post-hierarchical culture? Utilising Sunbird Records, I am engaged in an auto-ethnographic study of the label. As a graphic designer is in the field of punk, rock, and hardcore underground culture, is it possible to design something more than graphics, to design a cultural field for subversive culture to thrive. To highlight problems, design situations and formulate solutions. The work will not only add to existing knowledge but empower existing knowledge. Artists, designers and communicators collectively have a responsibility to take research to the ‘Everyday Life’. The proposed research can be of value in engaging with a new audience as well as the academic community.

Jonathan Orlek – PhD

Jonathan Orlek
Jonathan Orlek

Jonathan Orlek – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced September 2016
Supervisors: Professor Steve Swindells and Dr Anna Powell
Research Centre:

Research:
I am investigating artist live/work as an embedded researcher within East Street Arts. My research focuses on the public and artistic value of House 45, a pilot live/work project in Beeston, Leeds.

House 45 is used as an active site to explore methods for co-interpreting artist live/work with local communities and art audiences. This will include the use of sensory ethnography and autoethnography to develop multiple, competing and playful interpretations.

Live/work projects have often facilitated alternative and collective practices through sharing economies, reimagining domestic space, or the accommodation of atypical family units. Contemporary spatial theory, mapping, and creative writing will be used to investigate the transformative social and cultural claims surrounding artist live/work.

Kushani De Silva – PhD

Kushani De Silva
Kushani De Silva

Kushani De Silva – PhD

PhD Part-time, commenced April 2015 (Third year)
Supervisors: Prof. Richard Haigh and Prof. Dilanthi Amaratunga
Research Centre: GDRC

Research:

Gender Equity and Disaster Resilience Associated with the Third Revolution Digital Technology

Resilience describes the capacities of societies, communities and individuals or a social-ecological system to deal with adverse consequences and the impacts of hazard events. Emergency Communications and Warning Systems will enable improving disaster resilience.  As many have online access today and young women have increased their online communication while young men tend to explore technology resources, the potential of using user friendly third revolution digital technology such as semantic features has the potential to improve the access to early warning/risk information supporting the decision making of the communities at immediate risk saving lives. Integration of gender perspectives into disaster risk reduction by means of fostering awareness about gender equity to help reduce the impact of disasters, incorporating gender analysis in disaster management can decrease vulnerability of the communities. Therefore, this study aims to critically examine the effect of third revolution digital technology on gender equity within disaster early warning systems.

Maheshika Sakalasuriya – PhD

Maheshika Sakalasuriya
Maheshika Sakalasuriya

Maheshika Sakalasuriya – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced April 2015
Supervisors: Professor Richard Haigh and Professor Dilanthi Amaratunga
Research Centre: Global Disaster Resilience Centre

Research:
During periods of conflict, infrastructure typically suffers from damage and neglect, and an absence of new investment. The vital role of infrastructure in serving human endeavours means that when elements of it are damaged or destroyed, the ability of society to function – economically and socially – is severely disrupted. Yet, with the cessation of violence, resettlement and reconstruction can also be a critical element of a broader process of reconciliation between communities involved in the conflict.

This study aims to develop a novel framework that promotes conflict sensitive development of physical infrastructure, focusing on the road network in war-affected area. It will consider the economic and social impact of infrastructure projects, as well as their contribution, positive or negative, to the process of reconciliation.

The working title of the study is “The economic benefits of Sri Lanka’s post conflict road infrastructure reconstruction programme and lessons for post conflict resolution”.

 

 

Mila Burcikova – PhD

Mila Burcikoba
Mila Burcikoba

Mila Burcikova – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced September 2015
Supervisors: Dr Kevin Almond and Dr Natalie McCreesh
Research Centre: Fashion Thinking

Research:

Can an emotional attachment to clothes be designed?

This practice-led research explores the concept of emotional attachment to fashionable clothing.

Fashion consumers often form deep and complex attachments to clothes, cultivating a sensibility that transcends seasonality and instant gratification. This scenario challenges the contemporary notions of disposable and fast fashion.  

Although there are numerous strategies and tools for emotional design, these have mainly focused on product design and received little critical examination in the area of fashion design and making. This research therefore explores the application of emotional design strategies in design and making of fashionable clothing.

The research combines qualitative data gathered from ethnography with practice-led methods within art and design. Further, quantitative data, is gathered from surveys.

The study aims to provide a new understanding of the fashion consumer-garment bond to be used as a tool for enhancing user experience of fashionable clothing, possibly also leading to more sustainable fashion consumption patterns

Nicola Redmore – PhD

Nicola Redmore
Nicola Redmore

Nicola Redmore – PhD

PhD commenced October 2015
Supervisors: Dr Tracy Cassidy and Dr Lucy Montague

Research:

Slowing down the creative process to engage with the materials themselves, this research starts to explore the potential of hand woven leno structures to be used within the landscape and to explore the process of change in response to environmental factors.  There is a delicate relationship between textiles and the landscape, in response to which the designer of performance fabrics is required to create, indestructible solutions, with a lifetime guarantee. By embracing the science of uncertainty, fresh ideas and new solutions have the potential to be created and the research will be centred on the development of textile responses to the landscape, on and off the loom, using leno weaving and other stable/flexible knot forming systems of fabric construction.

Ngo Kien Thinh – PhD

Ngo Kien Thinh
Ngo Kien Thinh

Ngo Kien Thinh – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced September 2015
Supervisors: Dr Yun Gao and Dr Ioanni Delsante

Research:
A study of the social-cultural aspects of the self-built housing in Hanoi city, Vietnam after the economic reform in the 1980s.
In Vietnam, private self-built housing has contributed large amounts shelter, and they play important role to characterize Vietnamese urban. Throughout history, although there are various changes in the architectural elements, there are still some important rules within the dynamic transformation process. Among the strict control of regulations and plans, the self-built housing, which organized by citizen to suit with their life styles, can not easy to replace by modern house forms. Base on this observation, the original question of this study has been how and why do people practice the self-built construction under the complex urban environment? And what is the primary concept within the self-built housing?

Oshienemen Albert – PhD

Albert Oshienemen
Albert Oshienemen

Oshienemen Albert – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced April 2015
Supervisors: Professor Dilanthi Amaratunga and Professor Richard Haigh

Research:
A model towards oil spill disaster risk reduction and management in the oil and gas region of Nigeria.

The Nigeria Niger Delta has been suffering from negative environmental consequences of oil development since the discovery of oil in the 1950s. The growth of the country’s oil industry, combined with a population explosion and lack of enforcement of the environmental regulation has led to substantial damage to the environment. Many oil spills have contaminated the coastal shorelines, causing severe localised ecological damage to the near-shore communities. Oil spills in the Niger Delta have been a regular occurrences and the resultant degradation of the surrounding environment has caused significant tension between the people living in the region and the multinational oil companies operating in the region. This study aimed at introducing a new technique/ models towards the reduction and management of oil spill disaster and the impact of these spills on the environment and human health especially the women in this region.

Pournima Sridarran – PhD

Pournima Sridarran
Pournima Sridarran

Pournima Sridarran – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced April 2015
Supervisors: Dr Kaushal Keraminiyage and Professor Dilanthi Amaratunga

Research:
Managing vulnerabilities of unplanned urban built environments through consolidating indigenous knowledge and scientific disaster reduction approaches

The unplanned urbanisation often leads to increased vulnerabilities to the built environment such as increased cost of housing and infrastructure, emergence of slums, poor accessibility to the buildings, unendurable constructions, overexploitation of resources, inequity of the expenditures, and unsustainable degradation of the environment. Gradually, these vulnerabilities lead to negative consequences in case of a destructive event.

In many cultural contexts indigenous knowledge was used as an early warning of disasters. Indigenous inhabitants have cultured to adapt the gradual change and adjust their livelihood strategies. Literatures proved that, knowledge of local people through years of experiences supports to deal with disastrous situations compared to officials appointed by the government bodies. However, this knowledge often overlooked by the professionals and the government bodies. Therefore, indigenous knowledge needs to be drawn upon in addressing the environmental hazards and the consequences for concentrated communities of urban built environments. This research aims to develop a model to consolidate indigenous knowledge and scientific disaster reduction approaches.

Puy Soden – PhD

Puy Soden
Puy Soden

Puy Soden – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced October 2014
Supervisors: Dr Juliet MacDonald, Dr Jill Townsley and Professor Steve Swindells

Research:
The aim of the practice-led research project is to investigate three key aspects of the researcher’s own painting practice, which are termed: ‘touch’, ‘grounding’ and ‘resonance’.  The enquiry will focus on the overlaps and intersections among these three aspects of practice via painting experiments.

Ramy Hammady – PhD

Ramy Hammady
Ramy Hammady

Ramy Hammady – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced September 2015
Supervisors: Prof. Minhua Eunice Ma and Prof. Nicholas Temple
Research Centre:

Research:

“How the visual communications through augmented reality (AR) techniques influence the touristic guidance in museums in Egypt?”
 
In Egypt there is a need for using augmented reality applications in different fields - especially the tourism industry. So, the PhD research seeks to discover the potentials augmented reality techniques may add to the field of trusts guidance and educational process. On the other hand, if AR utilized in combination with a wide variety of exclusive methods including visual effects.
 
Besides the empirical research will explore detailed understanding of current systems of conventional approaches of touristic guidance to addresstouristicguidance the differences between Virtual guidance using augmented reality and conventional approaches of by developing a comparative study between the two approaches.
 
The idea is to develop an AR mobile app model in Egyptian museum to investigate which approach is more attractive, amusing, effective and has more influences on the tourists/ visitors of historical places in Egypt.

Richard Nicholls – PhD

Richard Nicholls
Richard Nicholls

Richard Nicholls – PhD

Supervisors: Charles Hippisley-Cox and Dr Yun Gao
Research Centre: CUDAS

Research:
Within the UK domestic buildings account for one quarter of UK energy consumption which is higher than the amount consumed by non-domestic buildings such as factories, offices, and retail buildings. The consumption of fossil fuel based energy results in the release of Carbon Dioxide which has been shown to contribute to climate change. In response to this the government has set ambitious targets to reduce the space heating energy use of new housing to zero by 2016. However, two problems remain. Firstly, the vast majority of dwellings are existing properties that will not benefit from these new standards and secondly those new properties built to the new zero space heating standard will still require some heat input. This heat is derived from ‘casual’ gains i.e. from occupants, lighting, appliances and most importantly the sun. This research project aims to investigate the latter of these gains by investigating the use of south facing walls as a collector of solar thermal energy.

Robert Silkstone – PhD

Robert Silkstone
Robert Silkstone

Robert Silkstone – PhD

PhD Part-time, commenced April 2015
Supervisors: Dr David Swann and Professor Richard Haigh
Research Centre: IDL and GDRC

Research:

'How can design improve the transportation and distribution of humanitarian aid products to communities in disaster relief sites?’

This PhD study will explore how design can address the challenges that face displaced people and aid workers in transient settlements and the difficulties encountered by humanitarian aid organisations in supporting them.

The aim of the research study is to develop new system technologies to facilitate the movement of humanitarian aid, medical goods and essential products around relief sites and refugee camps.

The PhD research seeks to identify the gaps and opportunities within existing systems and processes using a design-led approach to make an impact within the confines of present infrastructure and logistic systems.

Empirical research will seek to capture a detailed understanding of current systems, infrastructures, supply and distribution networks, operational difficulties and challenges, product procurement systems and specification criteria, and academic works related to this area of study.

Saeed Talebi – PhD

Saeed Talebi
Saeed Talebi

Saeed Talebi – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced April 2015
Supervisors: Professor Lauri Koskela and Professor Patricia Tzortzopoulos
Research Centre: Innovative Design Lab

Research:
This research focuses on improving dimensional tolerance management in construction. All construction elements are assumed to have specific dimensions and their location is dimensioned on the drawings to a theoretically exact position. However, in reality all dimensions and positions of installed materials vary somewhat.  The acceptable range of variation, permitted in a specified dimension or location without impacting structural integrity, operating capability, or abutting components, is the tolerance of the material or installed position of the material.  Despite the notable impact of tolerance problems, there is little evidence on the construction literature related to documentation of problems associated with tolerances. This research aims to present a systematic and practical approach for dimensional tolerance management of elements in construction projects using new technologies based on Lean Construction principles.

Sergio Kemmer – PhD

Sergio Kemmer
Sergio Kemmer

Sergio Kemmer – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced October 2014
Supervisors: Professor Lauri Koskela

Research:

Construction management in refurbishment projects
Refurbishment projects have different features in comparison with new builds. The degree of complexity and uncertainties is higher in refurbishments. However, studies indicate that companies are still using mainstream practices for managing production in such projects. Yet, data suggest that such traditional approach is likely to lead to poor project performance. It is contended that the construction management in refurbishments needs an appropriate approach tailored to its particular characteristics and in line with the lean theory. Therefore, this research aims at devising a method for construction management in refurbishment projects. It is argued that it helps to improve project performance by proposing a conceptual framework tailored to the nature of refurbishments as well as by indicating appropriate approaches of production control.

Sheriz Khan – PhD

Sheriz Khan
Sheriz Khan

Sheriz Khan – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced October 2011
Supervisors: Professor Patricia Tzortzopoulos

Research:
Variability in design workflow is a problem related to poor planning and control of design tasks and is a major cause of delays in building projects. This is because traditional design planning practices lack a mechanism to control workflow and are therefore unreliable. There are studies that demonstrate that the Last Planner system (LPS) of planning and control can improve workflow during the construction process by increasing task planning reliability, as measured using Percent Plan Complete (PPC). In two action research studies, the researcher collaborated with design practitioners at two architectural/engineering (AE) firms in Florida to implement LPS in two building design projects and evaluate its effectiveness in improving workflow during the design process. As Building Information Modeling (BIM) was used as a design tool in both projects, the researcher and the practitioners also tried to find the best ways to combine LPS and BIM to achieve better design workflow.

Stephen Hibbert – PhD

Stephen Hibbert
Stephen Hibbert

Stephen Hibbert – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced January 2015
Supervisor:  Professor Minhua Eunice Ma
Research Centre: Innovative Design Lab

Research:  
The human-centric digital age is upon us in the form of ubiquitous computing (Weiser, 1991), now represented by the internet of things (IoT), and the increasing adoption of smart-wearable devices.
Future and emerging technologies (Horizon 2020 European Commission, 2014), through the use of highly efficient and responsive wearable computing, offer the potential to radically rethink our approaches to everyday activity both in the workplace and home of the ‘proximate future’ (Bell & Dourish, 2006). This activity will become ubiquitous in its integration into our lives only if the control and communication of the interactive interface is sufficiently considered and transparent in its ease of use and understanding. This requires a cross-disciplinary understanding of the problems inherent in marrying two distinctly separate environments (physical and virtual) into a single user-space.
A multifaceted investigation covering fields such as neurobiology, metaphysics, cybernetics and techno-science are all necessary in guiding a design-related solution. These designs need to be conceptualised in order to communicate the potential for a hybrid augmented/physical interaction, and to indicate the viability of integration into the workplace of the future.

Stuart Katwikirize – PhD

Stuart Katawikirize
Stuart Katawikirize

Stuart Katwikirize – PhD

PhD Part-time
Supervisors: Professor Dilanthi Amaratunga

Research:
Research: “Community Capacity Building for Disaster Risk Reduction: Exposing and Challenging Level of Prioritization in Kenya”. Since the 2005 endorsement of the 10-year Hyogo Framework for Action (HFA)  whose goal was the ‘building the resilience of nations and communities to disasters’,  many gains were realized  but  with  abysmal  efforts  directed  at  empowering communities  toward  improved  DRR.    This research zooms in on Kenya, a Horn of Africa high disaster risk country, where after spending more than US$ 1.5 billion on disaster responses between 2009 and 2013; one would expect Community Capacity Building for Disaster Risk Reduction to be a top priority by the government of Kenya and her development partners.  This research therefore sets out to assess and where possible challenge the level of prioritisation for community capacity building for disaster risk reduction among key government of Kenya development partners..

Thanh Hung Dang – PhD

Thanh Hung Dang
Thanh Hung Dang

Thanh Hung Dang – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced October 2015
Supervisors: Professor Adrian Pitts and Dr Yun Gao
Research Centre: CUDAS

Research:
The study is seeking a balance between provision of the indoor thermally comfortable conditions and energy efficiency for cooling by optimizing design solutions and developing practical guidance of natural ventilation for specific dwelling types.

The main residential building type studied is ‘Shophouses’ which are the most repetitive vernacular terrace types found not only in Vietnam but also other parts of Southeast Asia. These dwellings are long and thin making it tricky to find ways to enhance the cooling effect from natural air flows which are the typical technique to reduce discomfort. Under increasing impacts of global warming and climatic events by rapid urbanization, it is more important to find ways to reduce the thermal stresses from heat discomfort. The dwelling types represent more than 40% of the housing stock in some areas and the consequence of the lack of air flow is increasing installation and use of air conditioning.

The project seeks to combine an understanding of building and urban typologies, planning implementation, thermal measurement, occupant surveys, modeling and other analytical tools to develop practical guidance and understanding for the future. In essence, it is to find the optimum combinations to reduce thermal stress balancing comfort and energy use.

Yeshwanth Pulijala – PhD

Yeshwanth Pulijala
Yeshwanth Pulijala

Yeshwanth Pulijala – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced October 2014
Supervisors: Professor Minhua Eunice Ma and Professor Ashraf Ayoub (Glasgow Dental School)

Research:
Did you know that 4 out of 10 surgical trainees in oral and maxillofacial surgery are not confident enough before performing a surgery?
 
Ineffective training methods and lack of focus on non-technical skills like cognitive skills, teamwork, and intra operative decision-making were found to be the main reasons for the low confidence and poor performance of the residents. Reduction of surgical training hours is further worsening this problem and severely effecting patient care. This PhD project is about finding if immersive visualization and interactive motion detection technologies can enhance the cognitive skills of surgical trainees, and there by improve their performance.
 
The idea is to create an immersive first person visualization of a maxillofacial surgical procedure using 360º video capture of an operating room. Further, we aim to evaluate the effect of this technology on the cognitive skills of the trainees and their overall performance.

Yunshui Jin – PhD

Yunshui Jin
Yunshui Jin

Yunshui Jin – PhD

PhD Part-time, commenced January 2017
Supervisors: Professor Minhua Eunice Ma and Professor Angela Lee

Research:
“Narratives in Virtual and Augmented Reality: A Case Study of ‘The Journey’ Story”
 
It is believed that the introduction of montage theory that makes movie to be a unique and the best art form for storytelling. However, many people claimed montage theory becomes invalid for narratives in Virtual and Augmented Reality context. In fact there is no empirical evidence to support this claim and no systematic research on the possibilities of transferring the theory to adapt the new environment.
 
This transformation of montage theory is implemented through a practice-based research approach. In the beginning stage, a set of specially designed fully immersive VR/AR 3D animation clips or sequences are produced to examine each different type of montage through data and behavior analysis of the reaction and questionnaires’ feedback from the participants. In the second stage, according to the result of data analysis in the first stage, the existing montage theory is remodeled to adapt to the VR/AR environment, and the special emphasis is on the combination of user interaction and montage

In the last stage, the idea is to develop one interactive VR short-animation and one interactive AR short-animation to tell‘The Journey’ story for the National Holocaust Centre and Museum. The VR and AR animation development utilizing the new explored montage theory is aimed at investigating the validation of the modified theory and the effectiveness of this new narrative approach.  

Zairol Auzzir – PhD

Zairol Auzzir
Zairol Auzzir

Zairol Auzzir – PhD

PhD Full-time, commenced April 2015
Supervisors: Professor Richard Haigh
Research Centre: IDL

Research:
Many developing countries, including Malaysia, are now paying serious attention to disaster management and considering it in their national development plans. However, because of the economic status of these countries, finance is a crucial problem, as disaster risk reduction (DRR) plans are expensive if they are to be effective. Without many options, the governments of developing countries have to carry out disaster management programmes with limited and insufficient funds. A large proportion of disaster risk financing is shouldered by government, following the perception that disaster risk management is for the public. Different scenarios can be seen in the United States and France, where government and private sectors collaborate to develop programmes such as the US National Flood Insurance Program and the French Caisse Centrale de Reassurance. Therefore, the problem investigated in my research is to explore how the implementation of public private partnerships (PPP) for managing disasters in developing countries can deliver integrated resilience-building and disaster planning; it will also examine the roles of PPP in providing better a DRR structure and reducing the financial burden.

Last updated Tuesday 21 March 2017
Thank you for your feedback.

Your feedback has been sent to the University Web/Digital Marketing Team.


The awards winner 2012, 13, 14, 15
University of the year 2013
QS 4 Star Logo
Athena Swan Bronze Award

VAT registration number 516 3101 90

All rights reserved ©