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Portrait of Dr Andrew Newton Dr Andrew Newton

a.d.newton@hud.ac.uk | 01484 473837



Biography

Qualifications: BSc (Hons), MSc, PhD, Pg Dip (HEP), FHEA

Andrew has worked in the field of criminology and crime prevention since 1999. He joined the Applied Criminology Centre in January 2005. Previously he worked as a research associate at the Environmental Criminology Research Unit (ECRU), University of Liverpool. In 2004 he was awarded a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Criminology by the University of Liverpool. Prior to this he graduated with a BSc (hons) in geography from the University of Sheffield (1998), and an MSc in Geographical Information Science (GIS) from the University of Edinburgh (1999).

His research interests include the geography of crime / environmental criminology, policy analysis and evaluation, computational criminology, crime analysis and GIS, situational crime prevention, crime and technology, and mixed methods research. He is specifically interested in crime and its relationship with alcohol, violence and the Night-Time Economy (NTE), acquisitive crime, crime on public transport, crime analysis methods, and crime prevention and community safety.

His research has been funded by a range of organisations including the Home Office, the Department for Transport, Alcohol Research UK (formerly the AERC), the ESPRC, JISC, the Railway Safety and Standards Board (RSSB), the European Regional Development Fund, the Government Office for the North West, Merseyside Police and Merseytravel Passenger Transport Authority, and Liverpool and Manchester CitySafe Partnerships.

Teaching:

  • HID1010 Community Safety and Crime Prevention
  • HID1011 Research Processes and Methods for Criminology
  • HID 1012 Victims, Survivors and Witnesses
  • HHB1035 Key Issues in Criminology
  • HHB 1038: Criminology Final Year Project
  • HMB 1034 Professional Issues and Applications (MSc Investigative Psychology)

Research & Scholarship

University research group memberships

Andrew is currently a member of the Institute for Research in Citizenship and Applied Human Sciences and the Applied Criminology Centre.

Research interests

  • GIS and Crime Analysis
  • Alcohol Related Violence and Disorder
  • Crime on Public Transport
  • Environmental Criminology/ the Geography of Crime
  • Policy Analysis and Evaluation
  • Crime and Technology / Surveillance
  • Situational Crime Prevention
  • Mixed Methods Research
  • Computational Criminology

Selected research projects:

Publications

(For a list of published outputs see research outputs)

Newton, A. and Hirschfield, A. (2009) (Eds.) Violence and the Night-Time Economy: A multi-professional perspective: Special Issue of Crime Prevention and Community Safety; An International Journal 11 (3): Guest editor

Newton, A. (2007) Reducing Violence in and around Licensed Premises: Best Practice Identification (European Union). Final report prepared for the Alberta Gaming and Liquor Commission (AGLC). Huddersfield: Applied Criminology Centre, University of Huddersfield

Newton, A. and Hirschfield, A. (2004) Understanding the Link between Bus-Related Crime and Other Crimes. Final Report prepared for the Department for Transport. London: The Department for Transport

Selected conference presentations

Newton, A. (2011) Improving Intelligence for Managing Areas with Alcohol Supply Points. Paper Presented to the Eleventh International Crime Mapping Research Conference, Miami, USA. 19th to 21st October 2011

Newton, A. And Hirschfield, A. (2011) How Places Influence Crime: Using Geospatial Data To Understand Patterns Of Domestic Burglary. Paper Presented to the 11th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Vilnius, Lithuania. 21st to 24th September 2011

Newton, A. (2011) Exploring Geospatial Datasets to Enhance Crime Analysis: A case study of domestic burglary in the UK. Paper Presented to the 20th Symposium on Environmental Criminology and Crime Analysis. Durban, South Africa: 19th to 21st July 2011.

Newton, A. (2010) Investigating High Crime Areas: Paper presented to the 19th International Symposium of the Environmental Criminology and Crime Analysis Conference, Brisbane, Australia. 6th to 8th July 2010

Newton, A. (2009) Measuring Alcohol-Related Crime and Disorder: Examining the Impact of Extended Licensing Hours in England: Paper presented to the ‘Tenth Annual International Crime Mapping Research Conference’ New Orleans, USA, 19th to 22nd August 2009

Newton, A (2009). The impact of licensing changes on crime and disorder: Paper presented to The AGI Crime and Disorder SIG seminar: Understanding and tackling alcohol-related crime and disorder. Birmingham, UK: 1st December 2009 (invited speaker)

Newton, A. (2009). Alcohol Supply Points and Crime: The need for better information. Paper presented to the 18th International Symposium of the Environmental Criminology and Crime Analysis Conference, Brasilia, Brazil. 8th to 10th July 2009

Newton, A. and Hirschfield, A. (2008) Towards a Multi-Criteria Assessment for Burglary Prevention: Matching Policy Data with Crime Data. Paper presented to the 8th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology, Edinburgh, Scotland, 31st August to 3rd September 2008

Newton, A. (2009). Building intelligence for managing areas with licensed premises: Paper presented to the MoCSSy Symposium on Modelling Issues of Public Safety & Security. Simon Fraser University, Vancouver: Canada. 1st June 2009 (invited speaker)

Newton, A. and Hirschfield, A., (2008) The UK Licensing Act 2003: Measuring its impact on crime and disorder in five urban areas. Paper presented to the 17th International Symposium of the Environmental Criminology and Crime Analysis Conference, University of Alaska, Anchorage, Alaska, USA, 23rd to 26th July 2008

Newton, A. (2007) An Evidence Based Approach to Reducing Crime on Public Transit: A UK Perspective. Paper presented to The International Crime Reduction Conference: Exploring Leading Practice, Banff, Canada, 9th to 11th October 2007 (invited speaker)

Newton, A. (2007) An Evidence Based Approach to Reducing Violence in the Night Time Economy: A UK Perspective Paper presented to The International Crime Reduction Conference: Exploring Leading Practice, Banff, Canada, 9th to 11th October (invited speaker)

Newton, A. (2006) Utilising GIS and crime analysis to evaluate the impact of new surveillance technologies on crime and the social environment: Methodological and research challenges. Paper presented to The New Surveillance: A critical analysis of research and methods in Surveillance Studies, Berlin, Germany. 30th November to 1st December 2006 (invited speaker)

Newton, A. (2004) Evaluating Crime Prevention along Bus Corridors: Paper presented to the ‘Seventh Annual International Crime Mapping Research Conference’ Boston, USA, 31st March to 4th April 2004

Newton, A. (2004) Exploring the Links Between ‘Bus-Related Crime’ and Other Crimes, Preliminary Findings: Paper presented to the Second National UK Crime Mapping Conference. The Jill Dando Institute of Crime Science, London, UK, 9th to 10th March 2004

Publications and Other Research Outputs

2014

Batley , R., Newton, A., McCullough , A., Horton , C., Hewitson, M. and Ellman, L.(2014) Oral evidence: Security on the railway, HC 1166. London: House of Commons (Unpublished).

Newton, A (2014) Security on the railway. Applied Criminology Centre, University of Huddersfield: written evidence. London: House of Commons (Unpublished).

Rogerson, M., Newton, A. and Batley, R.(2014) Security on the railway. Applied Criminology Centre, University of Huddersfield: written evidence. London: House of Commons (Unpublished).

Newton, A., Partridge, H. and Gill, A. (2014) ‘In and around: Identifying predictors of theft within and near to major mass underground transit systemsSecurity Journal , 27 (2), pp. 132-146. ISSN 0955-1662

Gill, A., Partridge, H. and Newton, A. (2014) ‘Interstitial crime analysisJDi Brief . ISSN 2050-4853

Newton, A (2014) ‘Crime on Public Transport’. In: Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice. London: Springer. pp. 709-720. ISBN 978-1-4614-5689-6

Newton, A., Partridge, H. and Gill, A. (2014) ‘Above and below: measuring crime risk in and around underground mass transit systemsCrime Science , 3 (1), pp. 1-14. ISSN 2193-7680

2013

Hirschfield, A., Birkin, M., Brunsdon, C., Malleson, N. and Newton, A. (2013) ‘How places influence crime: The impact of surrounding areas on neighbourhood burglary rates in a British CityUrban Studies . ISSN 0042-0980

2012

Batley , R., Rogerson, M., Nellthorp , J., Wardman , M., Hirschfield, A., Newton, A., Shires , J., Monchuk, L., Armitage, R., Sharratt, K., Johnson , D. and Chintakayala , P. (2012) Evaluating measures to improve personal security and the value of their benefits Rail Safety and Standards Board

2011

Newton, A (2011) ‘The Licensing Act 2003, five years on: taking stock and stumbling into the futureSafer Communities , 10 (1), pp. 20-30. ISSN 1757-8043

2010

Hadfield, P. and Newton, A. (2010) Factsheet: Alcohol, crime and disorder in the night-time economy London: Alcohol Concern

Hirschfield, A., Newton, A. and Rogerson, M. (2010) ‘Linking Burglary and Target Hardening at the Property Level: New Insights Into Victimization and Burglary ProtectionCriminal Justice Policy Review , 21 (3), pp. 319-337. ISSN 0887-4034

Newton, A., Hirschfield, A., Sharratt, K. and Rogerson, M. (2010) Building an evidence base on alcohol supply points: A pilot project to generate intelligence for managing areas with licensed premises Alcohol Education Research Council

2009

Newton, A. and Hirschfield, A. (2009) ‘Measuring violence in and around licensed premises: The need for a better evidence baseCrime Prevention and Community Safety: An International Journal , 11 (3), pp. 171-188. ISSN 1460-3780

Newton, A. and Hirschfield, A. (2009) ‘Violence and the night-time economy: A multi-professional perspective. An introduction to the Special IssueCrime Prevention and Community Safety: An International Journal , 11 (3), pp. 147-152. ISSN 1460-3780

2008

Hirschfield, A. and Newton, A. (2008) ‘The Licensing Act 2003: Measuring its impact on Crime & Disorder in Five English Cities’. In: British Society of Criminology Conference 2008, 9-11 July 2008, University of Huddersfield, UK

Newton, A. and Hirschfield, A. (2008) ‘The UK Licensing Act 2003: Measuring Its Impact on Crime and Disorder in Five Urban Areas’. In: 17th Environmental Criminology and Crime Analysis Symposium, 23rd - 26th July 2008, Anchorage, Alaska

Newton, A., Rogerson, M. and Hirschfield, A. (2008) ‘Relating Target Hardening to Burglary Risk: Experiences from LiverpoolPapers from the British Criminology Conference , 8, pp. 153-174. ISSN 1759?0043

Newton, A (2008) ‘A Study of Bus Route Crime Risk in Urban Areas: The Changing Environs of a Bus JourneyBuilt Environment , 34 (1), pp. 88-103. ISSN 02637960

Hirschfield, A. and Newton, A. (2008) ‘The Crime-Crime Prevention Relationship: A Manchester Case StudyBuilt Environment , 34 (1), pp. 104-120. ISSN 02637960

Newton, A., Hirschfield, A., Armitage, R., Rogerson, M., Monchuk, L. and Wilcox, A. (2008) Evaluation of Licensing Act: Measuring Crime and Disorder in and around Licensed Premises, Research Study SRG/05/007 Annex 2: Birmingham, prepared for the Home Office University of Huddersfield

Newton, A. and Hirschfield, A. (2008) Evaluation of Licensing Act: Measuring Crime and Disorder in and around Licensed Premises, Research Study SRG/05/007 Supplementary Annex prepared for the Home Office University of Huddersfield

Newton, A., Hirschfield, A., Armitage, R., Rogerson, M., Monchuk, L. and Wilcox, A. (2008) Evaluation of Licensing Act: Measuring Crime and Disorder in and around Licensed Premises, Research Study SRG/05/007 Annex 3: Croydon, prepared for the Home Office University of Huddersfield

Newton, A., Hirschfield, A., Armitage, R., Rogerson, M., Monchuk, L. and Wilcox, A. (2008) Evaluation of Licensing Act: Measuring Crime and Disorder in and around Licensed Premises, Research Study SRG/05/007 Annex 4: Guildford, prepared for the Home Office University of Huddersfield

Hough, M., Hirschfield, A. and Newton, A. (2008) ‘The Impact of the Licensing Act 2003 on Levels of Crime and Disorder: Evaluation methods. Appendix B Technical ReportHome Office Research Report , 4/08, pp. 1-14. ISSN 1756-3666

Newton, A., Hirschfield, A., Armitage, R., Rogerson, M., Monchuk, L. and Wilcox, A. (2008) Evaluation of Licensing Act: Measuring Crime and Disorder in and around Licensed Premises, Research Study SRG/05/007 Final Report prepared for the Home Office University of Huddersfield

Newton, A., Hirschfield, A., Armitage, R., Rogerson, M., Monchuk, L. and Wilcox, A. (2008) Evaluation of Licensing Act: Measuring Crime and Disorder in and around Licensed Premises, Research Study SRG/05/007 Technical Annex prepared for the Home Office University of Huddersfield

Newton, A., Hirschfield, A., Armitage, R., Rogerson, M., Monchuk, L. and Wilcox, A. (2008) Evaluation of Licensing Act: Measuring Crime and Disorder in and around Licensed Premises, Research Study SRG/05/007 Annex 5: Nottingham, prepared for the Home Office University of Huddersfield

Newton, A., Hirschfield, A., Armitage, R., Rogerson, M., Monchuk, L. and Wilcox, A. (2008) Evaluation of Licensing Act: Measuring Crime and Disorder in and around Licensed Premises, Research Study SRG/05/007 Annex 1: Blackpool, prepared for the Home Office University of Huddersfield

Newton, A., Armitage, R., Hirschfield, A., Monchuk, L., Rogerson, M., Wilcox, A. and Hunter, G. (2008) The Impact of the Licensing Act 2003 on Levels of Crime and Disorder: Key Findings of the Guildford Case Study, prepared for the Home Office King's College London

Newton, A., Armitage, R., Hirschfield, A., Monchuk, L., Rogerson, M., Wilcox, A. and Jacobson, J. (2008) The Impact of the Licensing Act 2003 on Levels of Crime and Disorder: Key Findings of the Birmingham Case Study, prepared for the Home Office King's College London

Newton, A., Armitage, R., Hirschfield, A., Monchuk, L., Rogerson, M., Wilcox, A. and Jacobson, J. (2008) The Impact of the Licensing Act 2003 on Levels of Crime and Disorder: Key Findings of the Blackpool Case Study, prepared for the Home Office King's College London

Newton, A., Armitage, R., Hirschfield, A., Monchuk, L., Rogerson, M., Wilcox, A. and Hunter, G. (2008) The Impact of the Licensing Act 2003 on Levels of Crime and Disorder: Key Findings of the Croydon Case Study, prepared for the Home Office King's College London

Jacobson, J., Newton, A., Armitage, R., Hirschfield, A., Monchuk, L., Rogerson, M. and Wilcox, A. (2008) The Impact of the Licensing Act 2003 on Levels of Crime and Disorder: Key Findings of the Nottingham Case Study, prepared for the Home Office King's College London

2007

Newton, A (2007) ‘Routing out the hot-spots: toward using GIS and crime-place principles to examine criminal damage to bus shelters’. In: GIS and Evidence-Based Policy Making. London, UK: CRC Press. pp. 69-94. ISBN 9780849385834

Newton, A. and Bowers, K. (2007) ‘The geography of bus shelter damage: the influence of crime, neighbourhood characteristics and land-use Internet Journal of Criminology .

2004

Newton, A (2004) ‘Crime on public transport. Static and non-static (moving) crime events Western Criminology Review , 5 (3), pp. 25-42. ISSN 1096-4886

Newton, A., Johnson, S. and Bowers, K. (2004) ‘Crime on bus routes: an evaluation of a safer travel initiative Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management , 27 (3), pp. 302-319. ISSN 1363-951X

Esteem

Indicators of Esteem

  • Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA), March 2011
  • Elected to serve as member of the School of Human and Health Sciences School Board, University of Huddersfield (2009-2011)
  • Elected to serve on the School of Human and Health Sciences Research and Enterprise Committee (SREC), University of Huddersfield (2010-2012)
  • Member of the School of Human and Health Sciences School Research Ethics Panel (SREP) (April 2011 to present)
  • Honorary Senior Research Associate, Department of Security and Crime Science, University College London (1st November 2010 to 30th October 2013)
  • Visiting Scholar: School of Law, the University of Sheffield (April 2011 to April 2012)
  • Committee Member of The International Crime and Intelligence Analysis Conference
  • Member of European Society of Criminology
  • Committee Member of International Academy of Investigative Psychology
  • Member of the Association for Geographical Information (AGI) Special Interest Group (SIG) on Crime and Disorder
  • Panel member of the University of Huddersfield Institutional Audit 2010 Quality Assurance Agency (QAA)
  • Peer Reviewer for: Crime and Community Safety: An International Journal; Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency; Crime Mapping: A Journal of Research and Practice; Addiction; Crime Prevention Series (Criminal Justice Press); Wiley; and Future Internet
  • Grant Reviewer for ESRC Small Grants/Large Grants/KTP; the National Fund for Scientific Research (Belgium); and the NIHR Public Health Research programme

Research Degree Supervision

Corridors of crime

Corridors of crime typically comprise dual carriageways along which are located commercial premises such as hotels, restaurants, petrol stations and public houses that are repeatedly victimised and targeted for the specific crimes of burglary, robbery and theft. They also feature in the journey to crime for travelling offenders. The analysis of crime along these corridors is a neglected area of research. This study will explore the theoretical and crime prevention implications of crime along major arterial roads paying particular attention to how far crime along transport corridors is opportunistic or organised and affects crime risks in surrounding areas.

Indicative Methodology: Crime hot spot mapping using Geographical Information Systems, face to face interviews with police, businesses and offenders.

Mapping and measuring displacement of crime

The growth of situational crime prevention measures over the past 30 years has resulted in a school of thought that suggests this technique will be unsuccessful, based on the conception that crime will simply be displaced. Whilst there is a growing body of evidence that seems to suggest displacement does not occur, or occurs at a reduced level to prior crime (a net reduction) there is a limited knowledge of both the mechanisms behind displacement, and of analytical techniques to measure displacement. There are also a number of forms of possible displacement (spatial, temporal, tactical, target, offender and crime switch), plus the possibility of diffusion of benefit (unintended benefits of a prevention scheme beyond the intended target area). Thus, there is a need to develop a theoretical and methodological framework for explaining potential displacement of crime.

Indicative Methodology: Crime data analysis, hot spot mapping, measurement of crime, Geographical Information Systems, interviews.

Mapping and measuring perceptions of crime

Recently their has been a growth in the mapping of crime data, with a focus on examining the manifestation of crime hot spots, and targeting resources to hot spot areas. However, whilst there has been much effort into mapping levels of crime in an area, their have been limited efforts afforded to mapping and measuring perceptions of an area geographically, and also how this changes over time. The British Crime Survey demonstrates using recorded crime data under-reports crime, and uses survey data to estimate levels of under-reporting. However, few studies have looked at the geographical relationship between recorded crime and perceptions of crime, of how these relationships may change over time, and of potential influences to these perceptions (for example media portrayal or the socio-demographic make up of an area. The focus of this study is to develop a theoretical and methodological framework to examine the geographical relationship between recorded levels of crime, and perceptions of crime/fear of crime, and furthermore how this changes temporally, and in relation to crime prevention activity.

Indicative Methodology: Crime data analysis, hot spot mapping, measurement of crime, Geographical Information Systems, interviews.

Developing cost effectiveness methodologies for crime prevention

The cost effective delivery of public services has become increasingly important to both central and local government. Cost Effectiveness Analysis (CEA) enables the valuing of relevant costs and benefits to government and society of alternative interventions helping to select the most suitable and cost effective option. Currently methodologies for CEA within crime prevention are limited by their over-reliance on police recorded crime data, the paucity of available information on crime prevention inputs and over-simplification of the relationship between inputs, outputs and outcomes. This study will assess the comparative strengths and weaknesses of methodologies available to analyse cost effectiveness. The study will develop and test a refined methodology applicable to the real world contexts of crime prevention policy.

Indicative methodology: Crime analysis and modeling, econometric analysis.

Last updated Thursday 6 March 2014
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