Master of Law LLM 2017-18

About the course

This course is ideal for those students who want to engage in a critical analysis of a range of legal subjects. The course has proved particularly attractive to those holding senior positions in NGOs, international institutions, government and industry who see this as a means of analysing the way in which the law impacts on their work. Graduates on the course have used the dissertation as an opportunity to research an area that is beneficial to their government or employer. Examples of dissertations undertaken include: ‘The way in which health and safety laws impact on industrial chemical industries', ‘The adoption of laws to counteract money laundering in emerging economies' and ‘The establishment of intellectual property law enforcement to enable a country to adhere to its obligations to the World Trade Organisation (WTO)'.

The course also provides an ideal foundation for those intending to pursue PhDs. This course is also available by distance learning.

Listen to what our students and staff have to say about postgraduate study at Huddersfield in our course and subject videos.

Start date:
18 / 09 / 2017


1 Year full-time
2 Years part-time

Entry requirements

An Honours degree (2:2 or above) in Law, a related degree or equivalent. If your Undergraduate degree is not in Law, you will be required to take the Introduction to Law module.

For applicants whose first language or language of instruction is not English you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum of IELTS 6.0 overall with no element lower than 5.5, will be considered acceptable, or equivalent. Students with a score of 5.5 may enrol after successful completion of the University's pre-sessional course.


Tel: 01484 472956

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Course content

You will study the compulsory module Legal Research Methods in your first term as well as Introduction to Law if your first degree did not major in Law. During the first term the modules taken usually will total 60 credits (depending on the options taken). Followed by a further 60 credits in the second term. Thus a total of 120 credits during the first two terms. The final term is dedicated to the dissertation.

Core modules:

Legal Research Methods

This module aims to develop students’ research skills, gives guidance on referencing using the Oxford system, and provides a foundation in research methods which can be used when preparing to write the dissertation.

Introduction to Law

This module is a compulsory module for those students who have not previously studied law. Students on the module will study the English Legal System and will also be introduced to the basic principles in the Law of Tort Criminal Law and Contract Law. This should provide a sound basis for studying the other modules on the course.


The aim of the dissertation module is to provide you with the opportunity to manage and extend an academic research task and to demonstrate in writing a critical understanding of issues raised in a self-selected area of law. That area should reflect some of the themes from modules already studied. It requires the successful completion of a dissertation on a topic of your choice (subject to supervisory expertise being available) plus a record of research.

Option modules:

Commercial Law

This module is compulsory on the LLM in Commercial Law and is designed to enable you to gain a thorough grounding in Commercial Law which is capable of supporting more specialised option modules in commercial subjects. You will critically evaluate whether the various forms of regulation are appropriate for business in the 21st century.

Corporate Responsibility & Governance

The aim of this module is to enable your understanding of the theory and practice of corporate governance and how this interfaces with ethical issues involving stakeholders in corporations. It attempts to achieve this through a mix of seminars, cases, and exercises that promote critical and reflective debate.

Employment Law

This module introduces you to the employer/ employee relationship contractual terms and termination of contract. You will also study the equality legislation and explore the nature of discrimination in the workplace. The assessment is by way of one written assignment on a topic from a choice of four given titles.

Global Intellectual Property Rights

Intellectual property includes copyright, trademarks and patents. The module is designed to provide students with a critical understanding of the ways in which the owners of such rights can protect them on a global basis. The class and interactive sessions are designed to engage students into a critical and analytical discussion of whether the protection afforded is satisfactory in the global economy.

The module is assessed by an interactive activity such as a wiki / discussion board (worth 25% of module marks) and an individual assignment (worth 75% of module marks).

International Criminal Law

This module examines the nature and content of international criminal law. In particular we study the elements of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes in addition to their historical and political background. Students are encouraged to carry out independent research and present their findings throughout the course of the module.

The Law and Practice of International Trade

This module examines the various sources of international trade law. It then sets out to identify the various problems associated with international trade law and practice, before moving on to critically explore the different types of international trade transactions, methods of financing international trade, and the ways in which international trade transactions come into being, and how they are performed.

Private International Law

The module is designed to provide students with an understanding of the structure and content of the principles of private international law. The module will examines the various sources and the subjects of private international law, the role of private international law in the resolution of private disputes with an international dimension or procedural issues relating to the conflict of laws.

Public International Law

Public International Law is designed to provide you with an understanding of the structure and content of the principles of Public International Law, the relationship between Public International law and Private International Law and the interaction between Public International Law and national law. The module also examines the various sources and subjects of Public International Law, the question of state jurisdiction and sovereign immunity and developments in the area of state responsibility. Relevant aspects of the law of treaties, the law of the sea and the settlement of international disputes between states will also be studied.

Appropriate modules are also available from other programmes but students can only take one module of no more than 15 credits.

NB Some the above modules may not be taken together in the General LLM, please contact the course tutor for more details.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below.

We review all optional modules each year and change them to reflect the expertise of our staff, current trends in research and as a result of student feedback. We will always ensure that you have a range of options to choose from and we will let students know in good time the options available for them to choose for the following year.

We will only change core modules for a course if it is necessary for us to do so, for example to maintain course accreditation. We will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible, usually before you begin the relevant academic year.

Sometimes we have to make changes to other aspects of a course or how it is delivered. We only make these changes if they are for reasons outside of our control, or where they are for our students’ benefit. Again, we will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible, usually before the relevant academic year. Our regulations set out our procedure which we will follow when we need to make any such changes.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Higher Education Funding Council for England is the principal regulator for the University.

Career opportunities

The course is excellent preparation for those who aspire to teaching and researching in higher education. Graduates have also gone on to secure positions in industry, the civil service, international organisations. Students sent by their employers have gone on to secure promotion to more senior levels.

For advice and guidance on your postgraduate study options join us at our next Postgraduate Study Fair.

Professional links and accreditations

Studying for a Masters' Degree in Law is recognised as continuing professional development for solicitors by the Solicitors Regulation Authority.

Teaching and assessment

All of the modules offered start with introductory lectures. Students are then encouraged to engage in academic discourse through the analysis of cases, journal articles and research papers in seminars. Student achievement is assessed through 100% coursework in the form of problem solving exercises, essays, seminar papers and on-line discussion. All modules are supported by the University's virtual learning environment.

We have shared our good practice in the assessment of our modules at the following international workshops: The Annual European Intellectual Property Teachers' Network, 2011 (Prague) and 2013 (Lisbon).


The new home for the University's Law School and the School of Music, Humanities and Media is scheduled for completion by the start of 2017 and will be dubbed the Oastler Building in tribute to Richard Oastler (1789–1861).

Currently teaching mostly happens in the Business School, the most eco-friendly building on campus. It's a state-of-the art facility and provides you with a modern, professional environment in which to learn and develop. All teaching rooms are high quality and the school has a number of computer labs for teaching or for students' individual or group use. You'll have comprehensive access to online resources through Unilearn, an online learning environment which gives access to all the study materials you'll need.

The Street Café is a perfect area for socialising, networking and relaxation over a wide range of fresh food, hot and cold drinks and free wi-fi. Set in landscaped grounds by the Huddersfield Narrow Canal, the Business School is in close proximity to the Library and Student Central which offers a number of places to eat, areas to socialise with friends, the Students' Union, student services and modern sporting and fitness facilities.

Our Learning Development Group can provide advice on how to improve your academic work including writing assignments, referencing, research skills, presentation skills and time management. There are also specialist learning advisors for international students who can help with a range of skills including academic English and language support.

How much will it cost me?

In 2017/18, the tuition fee for this course for UK, EU and international postgraduate students at the University of Huddersfield will be £8,300 (see Fees and Finance for exceptions). Tuition fees will cover the cost of your study at the University as well as charges for registration, tuition, supervision and examinations. For more information about funding, fees and finance for UK/EU students, including what your tuition fee covers, please see Fees and Finance. Please note that tuition fees for subsequent years of study may rise in line with inflation (RPI-X).

Please email the Student Finance Office or call 01484 472210 for more information about fees and finance.

Additional routes

Research degrees are also available in this area. Contact us for details.

Interim Awards A Master's course is 180 Master's level credits, which would normally take one calendar year full-time study. Interim awards are available at Postgraduate Certificate level or Postgraduate Diploma level should you decide to exit the course early.

Please contact us for details of the credits required for these interim awards.

Other information

For advice and guidance on your postgraduate study options join us at our next Postgraduate Study Fair.

Listen to what our students and staff have to say about postgraduate study at Huddersfield in our course and subject videos.

How to apply

Research community

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through research our staff are contributing to the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills that are current and highly relevant to industry and the professions. For more information, see the Research section of our website

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