Music and Sound for Image BA(Hons) 2013-14

At a Glance

UCAS code:
WJ36

Start date:
23 / 09 / 2013

Duration:
3 years full-time
4 years sandwich

Places Available:
15 (this number may be subject to change)

Course Type:
Full Time / Sandwich

Entry Requirements
We require:
* BBB at A level or 300 tariff points.You will typically have studied Music and Music Technology at A level and gained grade B in at least one of these.

* BTEC candidates will be expected to have achieved DDM in a relevant BTEC National Diploma or from an accredited Access course and will be required to prove sufficient music literacy skills. Any tariff points gained from music practical and theory grade examinations will not normally be considered to be part of the tariff total but will be used to determine entry in borderline places.

* Applicants with prior learning or prior experiential learning will be considered individually by the School of Music, Humanities and Media Accreditation and Validation Panel, to assess whether it is appropriate to grant general or specific credit towards the course.

* Mature applicants with less than the normal minimum admissions qualifications will be considered on an individual basis by the Admissions Tutor and Course Leader.

* Applications from international students will be considered on an individual basis, and with advice from the University's International Office. Where necessary applicants will be expected to demonstrate their spoken and written English language skills by achieving a minimum IELTS score of 6.0.

For international students:
• You should provide examples of computer-based composition and/or recording, which could come via CD or url – Soundcloud, for example).

• You should also provide evidence of your interest in film and moving image, which again could come from a DVD or url link of your own film or sound design or music added to a film.

Contact
Admissions Tutor
Tel: 01484 472007
E-mail: musictechadmissions@hud.ac.uk


The course

If you have a traditional training in music, skills in sound recording or computer-based composition and a passion for working with images this degree has been designed for you. You will learn about the practice and theory of building sound for film and other kinds of still and moving image media, and develop a better understanding of the various sound and music creation roles that are undertaken in a range of media industries. The course offers training in music composition, orchestration, conducting and performance, as well sound recording, audio production, sound design and film semiology. It provides a wonderful opportunity for you to develop musically and technically, as well as intellectually as you prepare for your future career.

You will attend lectures and workshops delivered by industry professionals as we are visited by composers, sound designers and academic theorists every year. Our more recent visiting speakers have included Ray Russell (“A Touch of Frost”), documentary film composer Ty Unwin and also sound designer David Sonnenschein from his studio in LA via Skype.

You will use sound recording, mixing and composition studios that have been professionally designed and built for purpose by composers and music producers who have worked in a range of studio environments all over the world. This equipment is constantly updated, and maintained by a dedicated team, and there is also an extremely comprehensive studio booking and equipment loan system designed to facilitate your music production work.

You will be right at the centre of a huge community of musicians, surrounded by classical musicians, popular musicians, recording engineers, audio electronics experts and interface designers. This means that there is incredible diversity in the range of performance ensembles, concerts and collaborative opportunities available to you.

Finally, Huddersfield has an international reputation for contemporary music. In November every year you have the chance to experience the Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival in action.

Take a moment to investigate the course content but also take a look at what current and past students say about their experience here. You can listen to some of their work and also take a virtual tour of our studios via the facilities tab below.

Course content

This course is designed to develop your music technology and formal music training simultaneously.

Year 1
In the first year you will study music composition alongside computer-based composition and studio recording as well as developing your skills in counterpoint, harmony and analysis. You can also choose to study television production, interactive programming in MaxMSP or instrumental performance.
Core modules:

+ Computer Composition 1

In this foundation module you will study composition and technical processes for writing in a range of possible genres, and to develop a broad understanding of sound synthesis, audio manipulation and music production skills. The module includes tuition on technical fundamentals while introducing composers and genres that constitute the breadth of sound computer-based composition offers. Topics include theory and practice in sound synthesis and sampling, and genres include Musique Concrète, Elektronische Musick, ambient music, and contemporary electronic music artists and styles. Assessment is through coursework (100%): creative exercises, free composition and accompanying written documents.

+ Audiovision in Context

Your approach to studying music and sound for image will depend on having a good understanding of the range and context of the ways this has been achieved both historically and in the present time. Audiovision in context is a broad ranging study of how sonic and visual work together to inspire not only film and television but a range of other practices from art to videogames. You’ll engage with the analysis of audiovisual practice and develop key theoretical concepts which will support your academic studies. Assessment is through the development of an online wiki which explores the contribution of musicians and sound designers to the audiovisual world, an essay exploring technological change and artistic practice and a practical study of a specific audiovisual approach.

+ Stylistic Composition

You will receive weekly lectures and seminars that explore a variety of stylistic compositional approaches from Baroque to 20th Century. The emphasis will not be on originality but in developing a heightened sense of stylistic awareness through the close examination of a work’s instrumentation and compositional materials as well as its form and structure. In addition to utilising works within their original context, the module will use examples that demonstrate ways in which these stylistic idioms have been drawn upon and adapted by the modern film composer. You will produce a short folio of compositions in term one and an extended composition with commentary in term two.

+ Counterpoint Harmony and Analysis

You will study counterpoint in two parts in the style of Palestrina and four-part harmony in the style of Bach. The final part of the module looks at approaches to the analysis of music from the late-baroque period to the early-romantic period. Seminar classes allow in-depth coverage of these fundamental skills. The module is assessed through coursework (100%), which consists of a portfolio of counterpoint and harmony work, and an analytical essay.

+ Recording 1

This module will introduce you to the basic theory and practice of a broad range of techniques and equipment used for studio, concert hall and location recordings. The studio recording part of this module will focus on techniques involved in modern pop/rock music production. You will be having practical recording experiences in our professional quality studios equipped with ProTools HD and a digital mixing desk. The concert hall and location recording part will provide you with a firm understanding about various stereo microphone techniques for acoustic recording. You will be making numerous recordings of a classical ensemble at a famous concert venue called St.Paul’s Hall.


Choose one from:

+ Composition 1

This module offers an essential introduction to the fundamentals of composition by exploring the various musical parameters of melody, harmony, rhythm, timbre and texture through a series of preliminary exercises given in seminars and group tutorials. In term two you will build on this knowledge through the creation of a portfolio of short pieces for keyboard, voice and strings. The second term also includes demonstrations and performances from visiting professional artists. Assessment though portfolio of coursework (100%.

+ Interactive Sound Design 1

This is a creative module using the software MAX/MSP, a graphical programming language used to develop digital instruments. You will be introduced to the software and learn its basic programming techniques, gaining experience working creatively with these techniques. Though no previous programming experience is required, you need to be interested in the technical side of the creative use of music technology (an aptitude for maths would be an advantage). The learning curve is quite steep, but MAX/MSP offers you a unique and highly flexible way of manipulating sound unavailable in any other commercially available software. The assessment is solely practical, made of exercises and take-home examinations.

+ Television Production

The module introduces a range of audio and video technologies so as to provide the essential skills necessary to produce a series of short sequences and to develop the language and concepts required to evaluate the product.

+ Popular Music Performance Skills

This module introduces pop ensemble playing to you in the first year of your course. You study how to perform together in a small, acoustic group and also have a choice of more focussed tuition on either keyboard, pop singing (in a choir) or Brazilian, African and Latin percussion. You will be assessed via a learning journal (coursework) of your journey through the module (worth 25%) and a practical assessment consisting of an un-plugged style performance (75%).

+ Performance Skills 1

This module is designed to equip you with key skills in general musicianship. You will learn about and practice skills in improvisation and aural awareness, as well as gain experience in critical evaluation of concerts and your own development as musicians. You will have the opportunity to develop skills and experience in ensemble performance and participation. Assessment consists of practical tests (80%) and coursework assignments (20%) in which you will demonstrate your knowledge, understanding and skills through written assignments, music performance, and practical tests of your musicianship.

+ Introduction to Multimedia and the Internet

Serving as an introductory module to the web, you will be taught how to design websites and their individual pages, as well as creating your own branding/graphics and, of course, building it to make it live for the world to see. You will also learn about modern methods of marketing on the web and you will be creating your own content managed blog. You will also be making your own YouTube Channel and videos as well as practicing the art of social networking to get people around the world seeing and listening your content. You will even see how easy it is to make money from the web from a range of activities, not least by starring in your own viral video!
The module comprises two equally weighted assignments of progressive coursework, notably evidenced by live uploaded web content and social network engagement. There are no exams.

Year 2
Building on this balanced foundation, in the second year there is further tuition in computer based composition and sound for image however you also study orchestration, composing for film, as well as film semiology and audiovisual theory. Once more, optional modules provide you with opportunities to develop your traditional composition training, performance and studio recording skills.
Core modules:

+ Orchestration 1

This module examines a range of approaches to orchestration from the Baroque to the present day, focusing on the characteristics of individual
instruments, their ranges and tone colours, as well as strategies for the
combinations of instruments, including issues of balance, voicing, doubling,and effective control of orchestral textures. Assessment is through coursework (100%).

+ Computer Composition 2

Building on the skills and knowledge acquired in Computer Composition 1 or Technology for Music, this module provides further study of the techniques of computer music including synthesis, sequencing, sampling, editing, processing and mixing, and an exploration of the creative potential of these techniques. The module is based around the subversive use of software, focusing on making you a critical and creative user of the technology, in order to go far beyond the user manual. Assessment is solely practical, based around two compositions created throughout the year with the support of the tutors.

+ Music and the Moving Image

This module explores the relationship between the soundtrack and moving image. You will develop an understanding of the historical context of the soundtrack from silent film to the present day. Using analysis tools, the module encourages you to develop a detailed understanding of the function that music and sound has in film. While there is a strong focus on film, the module also looks at games music, TV idents, animation and music video. The module is assessed through coursework including a storyboard analysis (25%), online tests (25%) and an individual project (50%) on an area of your choice.

+ Sound for Image A

You will develop a practical understanding of fundamental skills for producing sound for film, television, computer games and mobile devices. You will learn about a variety of sound production professions, and the processes of sound production within various media contexts. You will also receive practical training in location recording, dealing with equipment, making sound effects and sound design, and preparing layers of audio for post-production, and study post-production skills for soundtrack compilation. Assessment is through coursework (100%): touching up rough sound materials, producing original sound and creating your own soundtrack and a portfolio of accompanying technical documents.

+ Composing Music for Film A

You will develop practical composition skills for writing film scores. Informed by your developing knowledge of film semiology and musical codes, you will learn about ‘spotting’, how to calculate timings and prepare for composition, while applying your ability to ‘read’ media and compose original music for it. The module discusses musical functions in particular styles, highlighting techniques for working with themes, managing transitions and how to show diversity of skill when building audiovisual relationships in music. Assessment is through coursework (100%): alternative soundtracks for a film extract with an academic essay, and an extended soundtrack with accompanying academic essay.


Choose one from:

+ Composition 2: Composition Techniques and Analysis

This module builds on Composition 1 with units in Instrumentation and Analysis. You look in detail at the physical and idiomatic possibilities of instruments, how they work, and how this can be developed to explore new sounds. The analysis component examines the techniques of other composers to see how they create form and structure. You will understand how to take the material explored in Composition 1 and develop this alongside instrument knowledge and compositional technique. The module is a mix of lectures, performer workshops, and clinics with invited guest composers. Assessment by portfolio of compositions and two analyses.

+ Interactive Sound Design 2

This module follows on from Interactive Sound Design 1 in developing skills for working with sound interactively using the graphical programming language Max/MSP. The module deals with more advanced programming techniques including the use of frequency domain processing and granulation, as well as exploring more sophisticated creative uses. As with ISD1 it does involve some technical skill but also offers great flexibility in terms of musical and creative potential, especially for live electronics. Assessment is by coursework.

+ Recording 2

The ‘Recording 2’ module will cover advanced concepts, theory and practice of recording and mixing sound. It will review some of the current ideas about recording and production, and place techniques and technologies in a historical context. In combination with the content delivered during the lectures for the module, you will gain practical experience of sound recording and mixing to a high commercial standard in our digital recording studios, where a series of in-depth workshops are delivered. The ‘Recording 2’ module is assessed by a recording submission, and in-class test (60%), as well as a mix submission and practical test/viva (40%).

+ The Music Industry and the Internet

This module is about the design and development of websites placed in the context of the music industry. You will develop the knowledge and practical skills needed to build interactive websites, and then undertake a music related web project where you will apply these skills. The assessment involves a proposal document which includes the planning, design and costing of a music-related website, you will then go on to develop a prototype website, and finally analyse your completed project.

+ Popular Music Directed Ensembles 1

In this module you are coached as a fully formed band in more advanced pop ensemble performance practice. The ensembles you could be in are: Folk, Blues, Funk, Reggae/ska, Prog Rock, Jazz, Laptop Ensemble, Frank Zappa Band, Guitar Orchestra, Guitar Improvisation, A Capella Choir, Samba Band plus opportunity to create originals bands. You will mainly play covers but there is the opportunity for you to write your own songs and arrangements. Assessment comes in the form of two practical gigs through the year (66%) and a learning journal tracking your experience in the module (34%).

+ Performance Skills 2 (Minor)

In this module you will be able to select one area of study from a list of performance areas, such as chamber music, directed ensembles or conducting. You will be assessed by practical examinations (70%) and coursework assignments (30%). The module provides ample opportunities for you to develop your knowledge, understanding and skills in a wide range of performance areas, guided and coached by our team of expert full and part-time performance and instrumental staff.

Year 3
In the third year you can opt to take an Industrial Placement Year. You will receive assistance finding a placement and then you will be visited twice by one of our academic tutors. Roughly 50% of our students take up this opportunity each year and benefit significantly from the experience.

+ Industrial Placement

In this work placement module you will develop social and personal skills through work based activities appropriate for registration in the initial stages of professional institutions. You will develop an understanding of the operating environment, in industrial and commercial terms, and of the roles and responsibilities of its staff. You will gain an understanding of the significance of your work within the commercial operation of the company. You will have the opportunity to get involved in the planning of work and projects from the initial investigation through to conclusion, selecting appropriate methods and data. This is a pass/fail module. The criteria for success in this module depends on an employer appraisal, a technical logbook and a company profile report.

Year 4
In the final year you will start to really specialise. You will develop your skills in surround sound computer based composition, and also learn and also receive guidance on the development of your professional skills and aspirations. There is a lot of emphasis on the development of your creative portfolio and for this you will include a major applied project. This is your chance to shine. With support and guidance you might choose to compose and record a full orchestral soundtrack for an animated film, produce a surround sound installation for still images, or create a full sound track, including sound design, for a short film. You might even undertake a collaborative project with a filmmaker, games designer or photographer from another course; innovation through collaborative practice is also supported and encouraged. At this point in your degree you will have developed a strong sense of your vocational and artistic interests and this final project is your opportunity to bring everything together.
Core modules:

+ Computer Composition 3

Building on the experience you have gained in Computer Composition 1 and 2, you will produce a composition using multi-channel sound, with or without video, live instrument(s) or interactive sound design. You will be introduced to new techniques including the use of spatialisation, video, interactive or mixed media work. You will be supported through the creative process through weekly tutorials, where you will be helped to develop your ability to work with such techniques creatively. The assessment is mostly practical (80%), based on a work submitted with an accompanying reflective commentary.

+ Applied Music and Sound for Image Project

You will undertake a major piece of music composition and/or sound design for image. You have freedom to choose the images and supervision with this substantial undertaking. You might, for example, compose an orchestral soundtrack for an animated film, music for still images, or design a complete sound track for a short film. You will also receive guidance with evaluating and developing your professional skills in preparation for future work in this field beyond university. Assessment is through 100% coursework: a professional skills portfolio and a 15 minute soundtrack and 1000 word commentary.


Choose at least one from:

+ Music in the 21st Century

This module explores the major issues and materials of current musical thought and practice. We will draw on a wide range of styles and genres to examine the diversity of music in the early 21st Century, and will focus in particular on some of the aesthetic challenges and debates raised by this diversity. Assessment is through coursework (100%), including a final project that provides opportunities for you to develop your own creative ways of demonstrating the findings from your independent research, including performance, composition, installations, multimedia presentations, blogs, websites and podcasts.

+ Researching Music, Technology and Performance

Research is often seen as something that other people do but we are all engaged in the process of researching music all the time as we make music, perform music or listen to music. The module takes as its basis the idea that research is something that you do and researching involves a wide range of skills and abilities, not just text-based academic research. You are therefore encouraged you to think outside-the-box in terms of what you do as a researcher and so research is seen as an integral part of your development as a musician, as a composer, analyst, historian, performer, producer, DJ, or any other musical activity you participate in. You will be assessed on a fieldwork project, a research poster and an extended research project of your own choice.


Choose from:

+ Advanced Composition

This module offers an essential introduction to the fundamentals of composition by exploring the various musical parameters of melody, harmony, rhythm, timbre and texture through a series of preliminary exercises given in seminars and group tutorials. In term two you will build on this knowledge through the creation of a portfolio of short pieces for keyboard, voice and strings. The second term also includes demonstrations and performances from visiting professional artists. Assessment though portfolio and viva voce.

+ Popular Music Directed Ensembles 2

In this module you are coached as a fully formed band in more advanced pop ensemble performance practice with the expectation that you will take a leading role in the group. The ensembles you could be in are: Folk, Blues, Funk, Reggae/ska, Prog Rock, Jazz, Laptop Ensemble, Frank Zappa Band, Guitar Orchestra, Guitar Improvisation, A Capella Choir, Samba Band plus opportunity to create originals bands. You will mainly play covers but there is the opportunity for you to write your own songs and arrangements. Assessment comes in the form of two practical gigs through the year (66%) and a learning journal tracking your experience in the module (34%).

+ Performance Skills 3 (Minor)

In this module, which is the Honours Level equivalent to Performance Skills 2, you will be able to select one area of study from a list of performance areas, such as chamber music, directed ensembles or conducting. You will be assessed by practical examinations (70%) and coursework assignments (30%). The module provides ample opportunities for you to develop your knowledge, understanding and skills in a wide range of performance areas, guided and coached by our team of expert full and part-time performance and instrumental staff.

+ Music Media and Markets

This module looks at different aspects of musical practice in contemporary culture. The selected case studies will introduce some of the different ways in which music is produced, distributed and represented both globally and within contemporary British society. Examples from the syllabus include: the music business and money – who makes it and how they get it; music as software – the death of the recording industry?; music and audiences – who’s listening and how are they listening?; elitist or populist? - the politics of music in Britain. These topics will be discussed in class where lively debate is encouraged. You will be assessed via an open paper exam and an essay.

+ Work and Professional Practice in Music

In this option, you will develop skills relevant to the world of work by studying aspects of professional practice in a number of music-related professions (for example, teaching, performing, composing, journalism, studio management, editing, recording company), followed by a suitable work placement. Teaching includes guest lectures from professionals, in addition to tutorials. Assessment is through coursework relating to your career research and placement (100%).

Placements

All the teaching in the world, on its own, will not prepare you as readily for the real world as a degree course with a placement year. With all the support you need in finding a placement and ongoing visits throughout the year, your placement will be an incredible experience.

With practical industry knowledge and a chance to make invaluable contacts, you will notice a significant change to your confidence, knowledge and personal drive as you return for your final year of study.

Our students have undertaken placements at Deep Recording Studios, Pinewood Studios, HUM, Shoot Productions, IRCAM (Paris), Factory Street Studios, Radio Forth, as well as in schools, audio electronic companies and various media and production houses.

Career opportunities

Often graduates prepare for what is known as a portfolio career. This means that you might set up your own sound/music for image company; providing orchestral scores and arrangements for recording sessions, original soundtracks, library music and sound effects, perhaps also undertaking bespoke sound design for clients. Some students have developed sample packs and set up a production company in their placement year making a smooth transition from being student entrepreneurs to professionals.

Your choice of career will depend on the areas that you choose to specialise in; however, graduates from our department work in a wide range of music and media industries as artists, arrangers, performers and composers in orchestral, electronic and contemporary fields. Some have undertaken further postgraduate study, including PGCE, MA and PhD while others have found work with major sound software companies.

Teaching and assessment

You will attend a mix of large group lectures, and group seminars and masterclasses in a variety of spaces depending on the discipline. You will attend lessons in recording studios, very well equipped seminar rooms, and final year computer composition is taught in 5.1 and 8 channel mixing studios.

The mode of directed independent study, and assessment depends on the modules that you chose. There is a predominance coursework based assessment which includes composition portfolios, essays and other kinds of written documents. If you study performance or conducting there are various kinds of performance examination.

Facilities

The centrepiece of Music and Music Technology is the Creative Arts Building, a £15m, purpose-built, state-of-the-art facility which opened in July 2008. The building has a spacious, glass-enclosed, four-storey atrium which is used for informal concerts, displays of student work, installations, and as a meeting place for students from various disciplines. The music technology teaching facilities in the CAB include:

• the Phipps Hall - performance and rehearsal space with two grand pianos (including Steinway D) and professional-quality recording studio attached (see Music Technology Studios tab below). Also houses a 26 stop, two manual tracker action organ in German baroque style
• four 'smart classroom' lecture rooms outfitted with cutting-edge audio/video hardware and software
• two 24-seat Mac labs with MIDI keyboards and soundcards, and one 25-seat PC lab
• 26 individual practice rooms
• one chamber music ensemble and three popular music combo rehearsal rooms
• two large piano practice rooms
• two percussion practice rooms
• organ practice room with single mount three stop organ
• Harp practice room
• Double bass practice room

• extensive instrument collection
• early music studio

• a range of Music Technology studios and workstations (see below)

Music Technology studios

One 32 i/o Pro Tools HD based recording studio, with two recording booths and a window on the main recital hall
• the latest 12-core Mac Pro with two Digidesign 192s
• Digidesign C24
• a stereo pair of calibrated Genelec 8260
• eight channels of headphone amplification
• a selection of preamps (DAV, Avalon, Manley, API)
• outboard EQ and Compression (Avalon and UA)
• Soundfield processor sps 422B
• Hartke Bass Amp
• custom Matamp 1224 mk2 all tube guitar amp with two 212 cabinets
• Yamaha Drumkit
• a selection of microphones (see below)
• a selections of DAWs (Logic, Nuendo, Digital Performer, Reaper) and plugins (Altiverb XL, FLux, NI Komplete, etc)

Three 5.1 composition and mixing studios with plasma screen for post-production
• the latest 12-core Mac Pro with RME Fireface 800
• Mackie Control
• Midi Keyboard controller PCR-500
• calibrated 5.1 Genelec 8040s with sub
• Widescreen Plasma Screen
• Cambridge audio 5.1 DVD
• a selections of DAWs (Logic, Nuendo, Digital Performer, Reaper) and plugins (Altiverb XL, FLux, NI Komplete, etc)

Three Pro Tools based overdub, composition and foley studios, each with a small recording booth
• the latest 12-core Mac Pro with a Digidesign 192s
• calibrated stereo Genelec 8040s with sub
• four channels of headphone amplification
• Mackie control
• various preamps (Focusrite, Avalon and/or SPL)
• a selections of DAWs (Logic, Nuendo, Digital Performer, Reaper) and plugins (Altiverb XL,FLux, NI Komplete, etc)

Two 8.0 / 7.1 composition and mixing studios
• the latest 12-core Mac Pro with MOTU 896mk3
• Mackie Control
• Midi Keyboard controller PCR-500
• calibrated 8.0 / 7.1 Genelec 8040s with sub
• a selections of DAWs (Logic, Nuendo, Digital Performer, Reaper) and plugins (Altiverb XL, FLux, NI Komplete, etc)

One Interactive Sound Design and new interface laboratory, with adjacent workshop
• stereo Genelec 1032s with sub
• octophonic Genelec 8020s with sub
• various controllers and actuators with MIDI and/or OSC
• iMac with MOTU 828mk2
• Yamaha 01v desk

Material Available for all studios
• 2 Analog Roland System 100m synthesiser with keyboard
• 2 EMS VSC III Synthesiser and EMS Synthi Sequencer 256
• Studer B 67 tape Machine with Dobly A
• wide-reaching microphone list

• ribbons (Coles, Royer)
• wide-diaphragm (Neumann u87/u89),
• tube (Telefunken, Neumann M147/M149, C12),
• small diaphragm (dpa 4006, Neumann km104),
• shotgun microphones for location recording.

• 6 HD cameras (Cannon, Sony) with tripods
• 14 handheld recorders (Tascam, Roland, Sony, Zoom)
• 3 multichannel field recorders (Tascam DR680)
• 6 acoutic guitars (Guiild, Fender, Wesfield), 3 electric guitars (Gretch, Schecter, Fender) and three electric basses (Ibanez, Fender, Squire)
• a wide selection of outboard gear and recording interfaces.
• and more...

How much will it cost me?

At the University of Huddersfield, we have worked hard to ensure that we set a fair fee for undergraduate students that offers fantastic value for money. The University of Huddersfield is debt free, meaning every penny you spend on your education is re-invested in you.

In 2013/14, the tuition fee for students at the University of Huddersfield will be £7,950*. Your tuition fees will cover the cost of your study at the University as well as charges for registration, tuition, supervision and examinations. For more information about funding, fees and finance, please see Fees and finance.

You can sign up to iHud here to make sure you keep up to date with the latest fees and finance information.

*In subsequent years the fee will be subject to inflationary increases. Please bookmark this page and refer back for up-to-date information. Information updated 22.1.13

If your course has a work placement element, where the placement is to be with children or vulnerable adults you will require a DBS clearance, the cost of which is currently £44.

You may be required to pay up to £40 per year for travel on trips away from the University.

Funding

For details of course fees please call the Student Finance Office on 01484 473904

How to apply

Research

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills that are current and highly relevant to industry. For more information, see the Research section of our website.


You may also like ...


Last Updated: Tuesday 28 February 2012
Last updated Tuesday 28 February 2012
Thank you for your feedback.

Your feedback has been sent to the University Web/E-Marketing Team.



Excellent
Good
Satisfactory
Needs improvement

Excellent
Good
Satisfactory
Needs improvement

Excellent
Good
Satisfactory
Needs improvement

VAT registration number 516 3101 90

All rights reserved ©